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wetlands

Wetlands are areas of land that are partially or fully covered in water throughout the year. Such as, river deltas, salt marshes, peat bogs, swamps, and mangrove forests. Scientists study wetlands as many of them offer unique ecosystems. Coastal wetlands also provide an important service by offering natural protection against sea level rise and coastal flooding.

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Fences are disrupting African wildlife on an unprecedented scale

An ecological tragedy is unfolding in Kenya, as fences go up and prevent migrating animals from accessing water and food.

Greenland seaweed helps combat ocean acidification

Kelp forests around Greenland take up enough CO2 to locally offset ocean acidification and protect local shellfish, shows new research.

Arctic soils: a ticking climate time bomb

Carbon emissions from Arctic soils threaten to greatly accelerate climate change by 2050.

Seaweed plays a surprisingly large role in global climate

Scientists urge for greater protection of kelp forests as a new study shows that they remove more carbon from the atmosphere than previously thought.

New method reveals the secrets of bog bodies

Protein analyses on Denmark’s large collection of bog bodies gives archaeologists deeper insights into Iron Age culture and society.

Greenlandic fjords get their organic matter from Russia

GREENLAND: A simple chemical technique sheds new light on ocean circulation in the Arctic and could help improve computer models of ocean circulation.

Ecosystems driven out of sync by climate change

Climate change has altered the seasonal behaviour of plants and animals throughout the food chain and could reorganise entire ecosystems in the future.

New Book: Ice-free Greenland in photos and science

GREENLAND: Dramatic mountains, lush valleys, desert plains, deep fjords and more, are brought to life in a vivid new book: The Ice-Free Greenland.

Plants could be unreliable for us as carbon sinks

A new technique reveals how the metabolism of terrestrial plants has increased– and can decrease – with rising atmospheric CO2 levels.

Tundra shrubs can speed warming

A rapidly warming climate is boosting the growth of shrubs on the tundra. These absorb more solar heat and intensify global warming.