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Welfare state

Diabetes is more fatal for the poor

Persons with type 1 diabetes run nearly triple the risk of fatal heart attacks if they have low incomes and little education.

No baby boom from cash-for-care benefits

The number of births per woman has declined since cash for childcare benefits were introduced in Norway.

Housing first for homeless people in Norway

Homeless persons in Norway can now choose how and where they want to live.

The Nordic welfare model is under economic and political pressure

Too many are receiving disability benefit. Too much sickness absence. Too few incentives to work.

Economic security for young Nordic adults wanes

Circumstances for jobless persons under the age of 25 in Sweden, Finland and Norway have changed dramatically the last 15 years. Many have become poor.

Earmarked taxes can finance elder boom costs

We will be twice as wealthy in 2060 as we are today. But it’s doubtful that we will be eager to pay more taxes – unless we know what the money is going to.

Welfare changed our view on children

The history of the Danish welfare state also tells the tale of how a generous welfare state changed how children are perceived. This can be traced to the changing school architecture.

Privatised vs. socialised health services

Depending on their leanings, politicians can portray privatisation as either a cure-all or the bane of Norwegian hospitals. Research doesn’t back either claim.

Privatised rental market inflates costs

Renting a flat in Oslo’s privatised real estate market is more expensive than in Stockholm and Copenhagen, where costs and rents are regulated. The two different Scandinavian systems each have their advantages and drawbacks.

More "disabled" in Sweden?

People in Sweden who cannot find work may be categorized as disabled, which in turn may make it more difficult for them to find employment over the long run.