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Vaccines

Norwegian vaccine against prostate cancer shows promising results

A vaccine developed in Norway stimulates the immune system to curb prostate cancer and has given results among nearly 90 percent of the participants.

People with children vaccinate themselves to protect their loved ones

Childless, single persons may take vaccines because they deem it important to protect vulnerable segments of society. Parents seem to be more concerned about protecting their own family.

This year’s flu vaccine packs a rather light punch

The vaccine reduces the risk of catching influenza by just 28 percent amongst persons over 65, according to Swedish figures.

Whooping cough once a childhood killer

He turned blue from coughing, and his mother was sure that he had died. Pertussis killed many children in the 1940s. After most children were vaccinated, it was virtually eliminated as a killer.

Plant based vaccines are medicine of the future

Norwegian researchers are trying to develop a life saving vaccine against dengue fever, which is currently hitting Asia hard with some of the worst outbreaks for decades.

From genetically modified tobacco plants to medicine for Ebola

A commitment to global health and out-of-the box thinking prompted Professor Charles Arntzen to develop a medicine for Ebola from genetically modified tobacco plants.

Cunning respiratory bacteria help each other survive

Swedish research reveals how bacteria supply each other with vital iron.

'We need to develop new vaccines'

Scientists are in a constant arms race against pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Their goal is to develop vaccines that will last throughout our lives.

Stopping the sexual maturity of cod

The early onset of sexual maturity is a great problem in cod aquaculture. Knowledge about zebra fish resulted in a new method that makes cod sterile.

Winter can be the ultimate chill-out

If you have reached the autumn of your years, watch out for winter! For reasons which are not wholly clear, from age 70 the odds of death in January or February are much higher than in the rest of the year.

What works best for back pain?

Your back is robust and you should use it. This is the message that many back patients are hearing from their doctor today. But is that enough? Do they recover more quickly if they receive more treatment, like physical therapy?