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Svalbard

Shelved fossil was a Svalbard jewel

The fossil was originally found on Spitzbergen, the largest island of Svalbard, in 1962. Fifty years later it was rediscovered amongst uncatalogued material in the storage shelves of the University of Oslo’s Natural History Museum.

The valley at the end of the world – and the magical mysteries we found there

OPINION: Plant life in parts of the high Arctic are changing fast, possibly due to changing climate and local bird populations, but scientists are still putting the pieces of the puzzle together.

The Arctic is getting wetter

In the last few winters, the airport in Longyearbyen in Svalbard was often closed because of rain. One of the major issues climate researchers deal with is how precipitation changes as the temperatures are rising all over the Arctic.

Thin Arctic foxes suffer more from industrial pollutants

The Arctic may be a long way from the industrial world, but harmful chemical substances find their way northward and concentrate in animals there.

Arctic fox feed at night to avoid snowmobile traffic

The Arctic fox is at the top of the food chain in Svalbard, but humans on snowmobiles are disturbing its mealtimes.

Flies and mosquitoes dominate the Svalbard archipelago

Global climate change is expected to cause major alterations in the years to come to the arctic ecosystems on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard. These environmental changes will most likely be detected early through changes in the insect fauna.

Red listed species on Svalbard

Red List assessment has been conducted for five groups of species on Svalbard. Overall, 270 species of vascular plants, springtails, freshwater fish, birds and mammals were evaluated. Of these, 71 species were red listed, of which 47 are considered to be threatened.

Blue mussels à la Svalbard on the menu?

Back when the Vikings ruled, blue mussels had a natural habitat in Svalbard. They disappeared when the climate cooled, but today blue mussels have re-established themselves at 78 degrees North. The Svalbard blue mussel is thus a clear and present climate indicator of a warming Arctic.

How is earth connected to space?

That is one of the questions the researchers at the Birkeland Centre for Space Science are trying to answer.

Greenland sharks have high levels of toxic pollutants

It is well known that polar bears accumulate alarmingly high concentrations of PCBs and other pollutants. It is now discovered that also Greenland sharks have contaminants in their bodies. The long-term effects remain unknown.