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surgery

How necessary is the world’s most common shoulder operation?

Patients who received surgical treatment for shoulder impingement fared no better than patients receiving placebo treatment.

Surgery in Norway just a bit riskier than in Sweden

A new study shows that there were more surgical errors in Norwegian hospitals than in Swedish ones in 2013. Ninety of the Swedish and Norwegian patients whose journals were used in the study died from what are categorised as “adverse events”.

Why some experience serious side effects from bariatric surgery

What happens during bariatric surgery can be just as important as the health of the patient before the operation takes place.

Most surgical meniscus repairs are unnecessary

Three out of four people could avoid knee surgery with a new form of exercise therapy, with significant cost savings for society.

Is optimism the key to making weight loss surgery a success?

A new Norwegian study compares people who underwent bariatric surgery with those who tried to lose weight using traditional dieting and exercise. One difference was optimism in the surgery group that they would succeed.

Digital models of individual patients’ hearts help optimise surgery

Every heart is unique. Cardiologists and engineers have teamed up to simulate the structure and blood flow of patients’ hearts using ultrasound and modern software. This can raise the success rate of surgical procedures.

Cutting the liver piece by piece

New surgical methods give hope to patients with cancer that has spread from the intestine to the liver. The disease can be changed from terminal to chronic by cutting the liver piece by piece using keyhole surgery.

The price of obesity surgery

Women who have undergone obesity surgery call for psychological follow-up. Unforeseen problems require better individual counselling.

Artificial heart with Norwegian sensor

France is going to test an artificial heart on patients. Inside the heart is a Norwegian pressure sensor.

Artificial liver can support the chronically ill

An artificial liver stationed at the hospital can help people with chronic liver failure to live longer, better lives.