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Smoking

Brain clings to nicotine craving

Nicotine dependence lasts much longer than we have figured. The reward system in the brain remains altered several months after breaking the habit, according to Swedish research on rats. This problem is worse for the youngest nicotine addicted rats.

Harder to predict heart problems among smokers

A method for testing whether you run a high risk of a heart attack seems to be less reliable if you are a smoker.

Easier to quit when cigarettes are sold far away

A longer trip to your nearest store or kiosk selling smokes raises your chances of successfully quitting.

Blood sample can disclose your biological age

A blood sample can reveal whether you are ageing faster or slower than your date of birth would suggest. Lifestyles can make you biologically from two to six years older or younger, according to a Swedish study.

Granny’s cigs can cause grandchild’s asthma

A Swedish study indicates that the risk of childhood asthma increases if a child’s maternal grandmother smoked while pregnant.

Granny’s smoking increases grandchildren’s risk of asthma

Children may have a forty per cent higher chance of developing asthma if their grandmother smoked whilst pregnant.

Well-educated men live seven years longer

Men with more years of schooling can expect to live seven years longer on average than men who only have a minimum compulsory education. The comparable difference for women is five years.

Special gene is causing some smokers to stay slim

Heavy smokers are slimmer than smokers who lack a specific gene, shows new study with 80,000 participants.

Smoking gene could be causing weight increase in non-smokers

New study suggests relationship between smoking genes and increased weight.

Snus smokeless tobacco can lead to smoking

Teenagers who use the moist powder tobacco – snus – tend to have low self-esteem and are more at risk of starting to smoke, one study finds. But researchers disagree.