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Researcher Zone

Articles written by researchers from universities and research institutions across the Nordics.

Researcher Zone articles are brought to you by ScienceNordic and our sister site, ForskerZonen (meaning Researcher Zone in Danish), part of Videnskab.dk.

Here, scientists write about their own research or research fields, in their own words.

In doing so they bring their expertise and knowledge out from the lab and into the open, where they can inform and help shape the public debate.

If you are a scientist based in the Nordic countries and would like to write for us, you can contact us here.

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Should we say farewell to the Arctic's unique nature?

A warmer Arctic could lead to major changes in Arctic plant communities that will influence local and perhaps even global climate.

Using personal data to understand aging

A new six-year research project shows how patient data can help progress scientific research while maintaining personal data privacy.

Everything you ever wanted to know about the history of haemorrhoids

Warning: Includes spanking and leeches around the anus.

Elite female athletes at greater risk of eating disorders

Especially in disciplines like running and gymnastics, where body weight is especially associated with aesthetics and fast running times.

What the world can learn from Brazilian coral reefs

Unlike Australia, coral reefs in Brazil haven’t seen any mass mortality events related to bleaching so far. Could Brazilian corals hold the key to more resilient reefs?

A single protein could be the key to treating hydrocephalus

A new study in mice identified a mechanism responsible for brain fluid production

Erectile dysfunction? Physical activity could be the solution

Aerobic exercise can reactivate the penile tissue and, in many cases, improve the erectile function in men with lifestyle diseases, according to a new Danish study.

Is China’s social credit system really the dystopian si-fi scenario that many fear?

OPINION: Many of the concerns around the social credit system are either inaccurate or one-sided.

Explore 200 years of climate change in Denmark, Greenland, and the Faeroes

DATA: Each year DMI updates their historical collection of climate data, which is available to download free. Here are some of the highlights.

An open letter to Danish universities: Let us show the way towards a more ambitious climate agenda

The letter is signed by more than 650 academics from a number of research fields in Denmark. They are calling for universities to lead by example, and implement climate friendly policies in the workplace in the hope of inspiring change in other sectors.