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Researcher Zone

Articles written by researchers from universities and research institutions across the Nordics.

Researcher Zone articles are brought to you by ScienceNordic and our sister site, ForskerZonen (meaning Researcher Zone in Danish), part of Videnskab.dk.

Here, scientists write about their own research or research fields, in their own words.

In doing so they bring their expertise and knowledge out from the lab and into the open, where they can inform and help shape the public debate.

If you are a scientist based in the Nordic countries and would like to write for us, you can contact us here.

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What's the (dark) matter?

We don’t know what it looks like, and can’t even be certain it exists. Welcome to the frustrating and fascinating world of dark matter.

Diversity leads to greater social coherence and well-being

Diversity makes us all more open-minded, both in our communities and at work.

No new drugs for Alzheimer's disease in 15 years

But hope is on the horizon that new drugs will emerge soon. Here is what the ongoing clinical trials have in store.

When is trust bad for us?

The paradox of trust: Research suggests that trust at work can lead to exclusion and stress among colleagues.

'Stay away from Allan, or you die'

A new research project examines threatening messages as a genre and the linguistic features characteristic of different types of threats.

Can nature clean up oil spills in the Arctic?

Oil-eating microbes often perform the bulk of the clean-up after an oil spill. But we might not be able to rely on these bacteria to clean up oil in the cold Arctic.

Are laboratory animals representative of their wild counterparts?

Despite being born and grown in the laboratory, our research suggests that their traits aren’t so different, making them perfect for studying how wild animals might respond to their environment.

Test yourself: Are you addicted to exercise?

Danish researchers have developed a world first. It is a new method to spot exercise addiction among children and young adults.

Can Greenlandic mud help feed the world?

Can nutrient-rich mud from Greenland transform poor tropical soils to produce more and higher quality food? This is what a new research project will study.

Climate Change draws invasive species to the Arctic

Warmer temperatures and declining sea ice pulls foreign animals and plants to the Arctic, with drastic consequences for these sensitive ecosystems.