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Researcher Zone

Articles written by researchers from universities and research institutions across the Nordics.

Researcher Zone articles are brought to you by ScienceNordic and our sister site, ForskerZonen (meaning Researcher Zone in Danish), part of Videnskab.dk.

Here, scientists write about their own research or research fields, in their own words.

In doing so they bring their expertise and knowledge out from the lab and into the open, where they can inform and help shape the public debate.

If you are a scientist based in the Nordic countries and would like to write for us, you can contact us here.

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Time to re-think the climate change challenge

OPINION: We now know enough about the nature of the earth system that the risk of crossing a planetary threshold that propels us into a Hothouse Earth needs to be taken very seriously.

Danish Viking fortresses were designed to fend off other Vikings

After four years, the excavation of the famous Viking fortress, Borgring, is coming to a close and archaeologists can now describe the fortress in a broader perspective: An anti-Viking defence that allowed the Danish King to forge a new, mobile army.

Researcher: Monopolies are good

OPINION: Without monopolies consumers miss out on the best technology at a good price. The task is to prevent that monopoly from abusing its power.

Greenlandic children are getting taller and healthier

The general health of Greenlandic children now appears to be as good as that of their European peers. And perhaps even better. New studies show that compared with Danish children, they are no longer characterised as short and have similar patterns of disease.

Ancient Palmyra: A story of urban resilience

The warrior queen of Palmyra, Zenobia, made a stand against the encroaching Roman Empire, but was ultimately defeated. But what happened next, after the Romans left is less documented. A new book reveals how Palmyra survived in Late Antiquity.

Why are some animals venomous?

Some animals, such as venomous snakes and insects, can use venom for predation or defense, which is an ability that has been developed through millions of years. And the evolution continues – partly due to an increasing pressure from humans.

Following a new trail of crumbs to agriculture's origins

Archaeologists have found tiny pieces of ancient bread from hunter-gatherers that predate agriculture by about 4,000 years.

You will probably hang out in 25 places this year: Here is why

Decisions and plans drive our day-to-day movements. But new research shows that fundamental limits constrain how, as humans, we spend our time.

New test procedures will save dairy cows from Mycoplasma bovis disease

Disease caused by the bacterium Mycoplasma bovis in dairy herds can now be diagnosed more easily and quickly, resulting in better welfare for cows and reducing financial losses for farmers.

Power to the people - How to make the low-carbon energy transition work

A recent study of two successful energy transitions in Denmark and Germany shows that transparency and community participation are essential to drive the clean energy agenda forward at the local level.

Danish Viking fortresses were designed to fend off other Vikings

After four years, the excavation of the famous Viking fortress, Borgring, is coming to a close and archaeologists can now describe the fortress in a broader perspective: An anti-Viking defence that allowed the Danish King to forge a new, mobile army.