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Preventive health

Early diagnosis will slow dementia

The prevalence of dementia will increase dramatically in the coming decades. But early diagnosis can provide a basis for effective treatment.

Serious ruptures during deliveries are on the decline in Norway

For forty years the number of serious tears of tissue among women giving birth was on the rise in Norway. Now the occurrence of these injuries is declining due to preventive measures.

11 hours of parental training increases babies' intelligence

A short training program for parents with premature children can lead to increased intelligence in the child, along with fewer behavioural problems.

Old study gives new insight into life expectancy

Almost 16,000 Norwegian men have been monitored over more than four decades to study life expectancy and its links to smoking, blood pressure and obesity.

Farmed salmon retains good fats

Norwegian farmed salmon is still a good source of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, even though these fish are now fed more vegetable oils than previously.

Geriatric gaming

Old people are saying “Yes Wii can” and have fun staying in shape with video games. Scientists now want to give them an array of suitable games.

Chronicles for the comatose

Norwegian nurses keep diaries for their patients who are in comas. When patients wake up these special journals can help them cope with traumas.

Omega-3 and 6 for premature babies

Premature babies are at greater risk of abnormal cognitive development and also have a higher incidence of concentration problems. Extra supplement of omega-3 and omega-6 in breast milk may benefit their development.

Targeted DNA vaccine uses an electric pulse

Future vaccines against infections, influenza and cancer can be administered using an electrical pulse and a specially-produced DNA code, which programs the body’s own cells to produce a super-fast missile defence.

Sitting it out

Youngsters in Norway today are not as fit as earlier generations, and even the best perform less well. Researchers now warn that a wave of inactivity could have a major long-term health impact.