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Preventive health

Helping to reduce hospital admissions for COPD patients

Patients can use tablet computers to report their daily condition. Hospitals can pick up early symptoms, take action and thereby reduce admissions.

Treating lumbar pain physically and mentally

Removing the fear of acute aches and changing ways we move can reduce sick leaves resulting from lower back problems.

Talking can help heal crash victims

Patients admitted to casualty wards are less prone to develop post-traumatic stress, anxiety and depression if followed up with nurse-led therapeutic interventions.

Paper strips that allow rapid diagnoses

Biosensors can be printed on paper, manufactured cheaply and provide instant analyses.

Fruit hinders abdominal aortic aneurysms

Eating more than two portions of fruit a day reduces the risk of the deadly ballooning and rupture of a main artery called the abdominal aorta.

Unethical to restrict linkage of health data

Letting data protection get in the way of linking health data stymies research into vaccination and patient care, and is ultimately unethical, argues Norwegian public health chief.

Cancer patients with high vitamin D levels live longer

The risk of dying from cancer is more than 2.5 times higher in patients with low vitamin D levels compared to patients who have high levels of the same vitamin.

Music therapy in child welfare

Playing in bands and organising concerts improves life in child welfare institutions.

Stress is good for children

Can children who are never exposed to stress grow up to be strong individuals? A psychologist doesn’t think so.

Backs get strained by overweight

Overweight women have a 60 per cent higher risk of chronic lower back pain. If the general population gets heavier, this will cause an increase in disabilities.

Get a better life: say no

Say NO. Focus on the negative aspects. Repress your emotions. That kind of advice probably does not sound right to a lot of people, but it’s a better idea than following fanatically positive, self-help books, concludes a professor of psychology.