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pollutants

Caged blue mussels can be used to monitor the environment

Wild blue mussels can reveal the amounts of pollutants in the water. But can farmed mussels do the same job?

The spread of toxic mercury contamination is affecting the Arctic

The transport of environmental contaminants to the Arctic via water and air is a threat to nature. In the Arctic, methylmercury moves more effectively through the food chain than in more southerly waters.

Air pollution from old ships reaches hazardous levels

At Chittagong in Bangladesh, obsolete ships from around the world are run ashore on tidal beaches and scrapped on site. A new study shows that the sites have dangerously high airborne concentrations of old environmental pollutants such as PCBs.

How much PCB does your body contain?

The human body contains many contaminants. A new research project shows that data models can replicate measurements of PCB concentrations in individuals, and thus help scientists understand what happens with these contaminants in our bodies.

Siloxanes: Soft, shiny – and dangerous?

For the last decade, Norwegian scientists have had their eyes on the chemicals that make our hair shiny and our skin soft. Siloxanes have greased our daily life for many years, while slowly seeping out into our environment.

Indoor climate in nursing homes can be dangerous for the residents

Even small concentrations of toxic substances in the air seem to damage the lungs of elderly people.

Environmental toxins affect infant growth rates

PCB and DDE exposure in the womb or in breast milk can alter the growth development of a child, according to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

Sperm harmed by soaps and suntan lotions

Hormone disrupting chemicals in ordinary products appear to have an effect on sperm quality.

Sea creatures are threatened by our medicines

Medication ingested by humans is taken up by algae and sea creatures. Entire ecosystems can be affected, according to a Swedish researcher.

Greenland sharks have high levels of toxic pollutants

It is well known that polar bears accumulate alarmingly high concentrations of PCBs and other pollutants. It is now discovered that also Greenland sharks have contaminants in their bodies. The long-term effects remain unknown.