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Polar research

Seventeen projects to generate knowledge about ecosystems

A total of NOK 240 million has been awarded to 17 projects to study the responses of ecosystems to changes in climate and the environment as well as the cumulative effects on the ecosystem.

Extreme weather in the Arctic causes problems for people and wildlife

The last week of January 2012 brought wild weather to the Norwegian arctic island archipelago of Svalbard and its largest town, Longyearbyen.

Climate change fills polar bears with toxins

The melting ice around Greenland has changed the polar bear’s diet. This means that they are being filled with large quantities of environmental poisons, and that forms a threat to the polar bear’s existence.

Oceans drive climate change

Researchers say that changes in the climate can be traced in the ocean hundreds of years before there is any trace of it in the atmosphere.

Weird diagnoses kept Greenlanders in check

Arctic hysteria and kayak dizziness were once used as diagnoses to bolster the image of Greenlanders as an ‘inferior’ indigenous people.

Getting Arctic raw materials requires a gentle hand

We must be very careful if we want to preserve the Arctic region’s special natural environment and culture while ensuring that the coming raw materials boom doesn’t turn into a disaster.

Lack of oxygen led to first mass extinction

The first mass extinction of animal life on Earth was previously blamed on a rise in the oxygen concentration in the oceans as a result of a cooler climate. But a new study shows the catastrophe was really caused by a massive decrease in oxygen.

Good news for the polar bear

The level of harmful chemicals in the blood of polar bears has declined dramatically in the last decade, new study shows.

Life after the Ice Age

Life after the last Ice age was hard, say the archaeologists who dig for clues about the first settlers in Northern Norway.

The gentle drone

Not all un-manned aircraft are prowling military predators. Drones can also be deployed to chart ice fields and pollution, or locate people who’ve fallen overboard from ships.