University of Oslo

Partner address
University of Oslo
P.O. Box 1072 Blindern
0316 Oslo
Norway
Switchboard:
+ 47 22 85 50 50

The University of Oslo is Norway's leading institution of research and higher education. Founded in 1811, it is Norway's oldest university. There are eight faculties at the University. The university has approx. 27,000 students and 6,000 employees.  The University's official language is Norwegian, but teaching is also provided in English in a number of Bachelor, Master and PhD programmes.

News from University of Oslo

Syndicate content
  • Both rainforest and peasants need protection

    Preserving the rainforests might come at a price. The indigeneous people of the Indonesian rainforest could loose their livelihood.
  • Fat bubbles and ultrasound fight cancer

    Cancer treatment is now more precise. Encapsulated chemotherapy strikes the dangerous tumor right on. Ultrasound spreads the poison in the cancer tissue.
  • Early diagnosis will slow dementia

    The prevalence of dementia will increase dramatically in the coming decades. But early diagnosis can provide a basis for effective treatment.
  • Cells with a licence to kill

    The body's natural killer cells are programmed to kill without the intervention of any safety mechanism. Now researchers know why.
  • The hunt for prostate cancer

    New biomarkers can make hunting for prostate cancer more accurate.
  • Learning about allergies from skin disease

    A rare skin disease that gives fish scale-like skin is providing a new understanding of the role skin plays in the development of allergies.
  • Vaccine against pancreatic cancer

    A professor at the University of Oslo has developed a cancer vaccine that can prolong the life expectancy of patients with pancreatic cancer. Now he is testing a new vaccine that hopefully is able to kill all types of cancer cells.
  • Omega-3 and 6 for premature babies

    Premature babies are at greater risk of abnormal cognitive development and also have a higher incidence of concentration problems. Extra supplement of omega-3 and omega-6 in breast milk may benefit their development.
  • Immune cells from healthy people pulverise cancer

    Immune cells from healthy individuals could be the new immune cure for cancer. This treatment can kill cancer cells without destroying neighbouring cells.
  • Targeted DNA vaccine uses an electric pulse

    Future vaccines against infections, influenza and cancer can be administered using an electrical pulse and a specially-produced DNA code, which programs the body’s own cells to produce a super-fast missile defence.

Meet Science Nordic Partners

ScienceNordic brings articles from institutional partners in all Nordic countries. These are labeled accordingly and placed under the column News from our partners.

See all our partners