University of Oslo

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University of Oslo
P.O. Box 1072 Blindern
0316 Oslo
Norway
Switchboard:
+ 47 22 85 50 50

The University of Oslo is Norway’s leading institution of research and higher education. Founded in 1811, it is Norway’s
oldest and largest university.
There are eight faculties at the University. The number of graduates per year is approx. 4 500, of which 400 are doctorates.  The University’s official language is Norwegian, but teaching is also provided in English in a number of Bachelor,
Master and PhD programmes.

News from University of Oslo

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  • Medical radiation may be reduced to one-sixth

    One of this century’s most significant mathematical discoveries may reduce the number of measuring points to one-sixth of the present level. This means reduced exposure to radiation and faster medical imaging diagnostics.
  • People with a rheumatic disease labelled as lazy

    Pain and chronic fatigue frequently go hand in hand. In such cases it does not help to ask patients to put on their training shoes and start exercising, according to a professor who has been conducting research on Sjögren’s syndrome.
  • New insight into the cause of Sjögren’s syndrome

    Patients with Sjögren’s syndrome have defects in their glandular cells that affect the cells’ function. These cells may be perceived as a danger by the body’s immune system and in order to defend itself, the body’s immune system attacks them.
  • Amphetamine gets the job done

    Drugs are usually associated with vulnerable social groups. New research reveals that amphetamine, however, is used by some in physically demanding manual jobs - to sustain long working hours.
  • Making the case for China’s underprivileged

    Fighting for the rights of migrant workers in China - without over-stepping the limits of what the authorities allow - is a difficult balancing act. But grassroots organizations are becoming increasingly brave.
  • Stem cells strengthen the heart

    Transplanted stem cells make the hearts of mice more resistant to heart attacks.
  • People with a rheumatic disease get labelled as lazy

    Pain and chronic fatigue frequently go hand in hand. In such cases it does not help to ask patients to put on their training shoes and start exercising, according to a professor who has been conducting research on Sjögren’s syndrome.
  • Sacred sites in Southern Lebanon are losing their value

    Several sacred sites in Southern Lebanon have been lost as a result of the country’s many conflicts. This has created sharper dividing lines between the various religious groups in the region.
  • Virus a possible cause of type 1 diabetes

    Researchers have found a virus in the pancreas of patients with type 1 diabetes. The discovery may offer the potential for both treatment and a vaccine.
  • Recreating clothes from the Iron Age

    A few years ago, the oldest known piece of clothing ever discovered in Norway, a tunic dating from the Iron Age, was found on a glacier in Breheimen. Now about to be reconstructed using Iron Age textile techniques, it is hoped the tunic will inspire Norwegian fashion designers.

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