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Why the passenger pigeon died out

The passenger pigeon was once among the most numerous species on earth. The last passenger pigeon died in the Cinncinati Zoo just over 100 years ago. How did it all go so wrong?

How very low birth weight affects brain development

Children born with very low birth weights are at an increased risk of cognitive, emotional and behavioral problems throughout their lives. But what exactly happens in the brain to cause these problems?

Houses reused for over 1000 years during Stone Age

We’ve always heard that Stone Age people lived in caves. It turns out that’s not the case. They often lived in earthen huts, which they reused and kept up rather than building new ones.

Bear hunting with caution

With man’s hunting activities, he is now becoming a dominant force in the Scandinavian bear's life, and the consequences are surprisingly complex.

Pope said "no thanks" to Norwegian coins

Norway minted its own coins during much of the Middle Ages. But the coins didn’t always impress outsiders or even the Norwegians themselves.

Ten ways to prevent school refusal

Are you struggling with getting your child to school? Here is some advice on what you should do as a parent – and what you should not do.

How beginners can learn to read music more efficiently

New research shows that literacy learning methods may help beginners to read music.

Old patient stories help computers to predict cancer

Old paper records of Norwegian prostate patients from the archives of a 80-year-old Norwegian clinician, will now play a surprisingly crucial role in developing future machine learning methods for cancer prognosis.

Thousand-year-old cathedral surrenders its secrets

The secrets of St Olav’s shrine and Nidaros Cathedral have drawn pilgrims for nearly a thousand years. Curious researchers have also made the journey, eager to solve the mysteries locked up in the cathedral’s stones.

Clever fungi catch a ride with beetles

Fungi living in wood are very important decomposers. But what do they do when the wood is decomposed and gone? How do they find new food?
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