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Rusty rivets reveal origin of Icelandic viking ships

Viking ships found in Iceland have decayed and often the only things remaining are the rivets. A group of scientists now believe we can learn a lot from the surviving pieces of iron and have brought them to Norway for examination.

Technology revealing the secret life of bats

Using digital technology and radio transmitters, researchers are going to find out where Norwegian bats live their lives.

DNA analyses reveal secrets about the Pacific oyster

Is oyster larvae drift across the Skagerrak the cause of wild oysters great increase? New DNA analyses provide insight into the origin of the first wild Norwegian sea oyster populations.

EU wants more organic salmon in stores

Organic salmon can be difficult to find in European shops, and people do not know much about organic fish in general. Now, new research highlights the need for updating EU regulations.

Securing the world’s longest floating bridge against strong wind

In order to build the bridge, the engineers need to know exactly how the wind behaves on the bridge site. Scientists are working on a new method for wind measurements.

Identifying Ideas with Artificial Intelligence

If you are a beer enthusiast, you have probably commented on some or other post in Facebook beer forums. In the future, these types of comments may be used to identify new ideas by utilising artificial intelligence (AI).

Exposing fake news on social media

Facebook is an important source of not only genuine, but also fake news. But now a new tool has been developed to expose the fakers.

4 months old and standing

With practice, children can stand without support even before they are 4 months old. This is much earlier than has been reported in the literature.

Scientists discovered an ancient forefather

UiB scientists have found the lampshell’s ancient forefather, and discovered that the shells and bristles of the lampshells have a much older origin than priveously thought.

Does international criminal justice still matter?

In April more than 30 people were killed by a chemical weapon attack in Syria.
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