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Lawyers in problematic dual role as arbitrators

New research shows that a small group, of almost exclusively Western men, shift seamlessly between different roles as arbitrator and lawyer in the settlement of multi-million dollar disputes between states and foreign investors.

Tomorrow’s fish farms will be unmanned

Robotics technology is making inroads into the aquaculture sector, making it possible to regulate facilities from onshore.

How to practice the right way

Now we know more about how to get really good at something. This is especially useful for people who are engaged in helping others to develop skills and knowledge — and for parents.

Sufficient levels of fatty acids - without eating fish

Bhaktapur is nearly 1,000 kilometres away from the nearest ocean. Nevertheless, the Nepalese have good levels of marine fatty acids in their blood. The reason for this is a mystery to scientists.

Analysing health records without exposing sensitive information

With the aid of a computer program, researchers can now analyse information in the patient's electronic health record without compromising privacy.

Economists are important in policy-making

Economists have a large impact on policy-making, Johan Christensen writes in his latest book, where he reveals that neutral bureaucrats do not exist.

Hope is green and Chinese

Heavy air pollution has led to increased environmental consciousness in China. A growing number of apps now allow people to check local air quality. Apps also serve as tools for political activism.

Can teacher students be nudged in the right direction?

Hundreds of teacher training education applicants fail to turn up for the start of their study programmes. Behavioural economists have experimented on them to check whether some nudging might help.

Inequality may lead to violence and extremism

While the differences between rich and poor have never been higher across OECD-countries, new research suggests that increased inequality can lead to higher risk of violence, racism, and extremism.

Rusty rivets reveal origin of Icelandic viking ships

Viking ships found in Iceland have decayed and often the only things remaining are the rivets. A group of scientists now believe we can learn a lot from the surviving pieces of iron and have brought them to Norway for examination.
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