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Norwegian researchers find new treatment for prostate cancer

A new treatment that strongly inhibits the development of prostate cancer has been found by an international research group led by the University of Oslo. The treatment can also enhance the effect of medicines already used against prostate cancer in the clinic today.

Improved fauna at the soft bottom in Skagerrak

Reductions of nutrients have led to a greater species richness at the seafloor in the Skagerrak after 1990. But warmer winter temperatures and increased river runoff might be the new challenges for the animal life at the soft bottom.

Norwegian lake hold several thousand year-old secret

People have wandered in the mountains of Gjesdal in the western part of Norway since time immemorial. Archaeologists have discovered a new addition to the site-complex from the Stone Age at the lake Stora Myrvatnet.

Regional business sectors need to be more varied

Regions with a varied business sector are better prepared for growth and innovation, concludes a new doctoral thesis from the School of Business and Law at the University of Agder.

Warmer winters in Svalbard are not good for plants

The far north is becoming greener. Yet, in part of the Arctic, on Svalbard, we are uncertain about what is happening. Climate change has led to warmer summers, but the winters are also having a negative influence on vegetation.

Quest to solve global water plant mystery

Mass development of water plants in river and lakes causes headache for researchers and water managers all over the world. New research aims to reveal the causes of the explosive development and identify ecosystem effects of removing the water plants.

The youngest smoke more

An increasing number of children under 15 years old have started to smoke during the last 40 years in Europe.

What does sheep grazing do to the mountains?

Livestock grazing affects the landscape. What effects does it have on the vegetation?

Bigger people will need more food

Food demand is growing as people get bigger. Feeding a population of 9 billion in 2050 will require much more food than previously calculated.

New report will assess how humans evaluate nature

The new intergovernmental assessment will try to understand how humans value nature and the impact of these views on biodiversity and ecosystems.
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