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Most people recover without treatment from tennis elbow

What is the best treatment for acute tennis elbow? Physiotherapy? Cortisone? A combination? Or no treatment? A new study indicates that you may as well wait a while before embarking on treatment.

Common group identity may motivate integration efforts

Immigrants may experience less racism and receive more support when citizens believe in a common group identity that embraces everyone regardless of their birthplace.

Does social media help us work smarter?

Social media was meant to help us work smarter. So far it has only given us additional work, according to new research.

Resistance training works well for prostate cancer patients

Men with prostate cancer should be exercising, a new study shows - to combat muscular atrophy and to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

Family’s hereditary cancer gene found

When almost a third of a hundred members of one family had cancer, or were cured of cancer, researchers began to look for a cancer-causing gene in the family. They found it after fifteen years of genetic testing.

New substance attenuates E.coli

An artificial molecule can impair the E.coli-bacteria’s aptitude to cause illness. This may have wider impact than solely for the illnesses this bacteria causes. The discovery may also prove a valuable contribution in the struggle against the increasing threat from antibiotics resistance.

How to win your boss's trust

Employees who help colleagues without thinking about what they get out of it, win the trust, support and goodwill of their managers.

Sound focus on health or eating disorder in disguise?

According to the fitness bloggers, the ideal female body is supposed to be slim, muscular, feminine and strong. However, the eating and workout regimes they promote are so strict, that even the bloggers themselves almost fail to follow them.

COPD sufferers prescribed most sedatives

New research has revealed that Norwegian COPD sufferers are prescribed even more sedatives than psychiatric patients. The researchers behind the study believe that this is problematic because the drugs in question are addictive and inhibit lung function.

Peering into fish brains to see how they work

Transparent fish and an ability to work in the dark are key to the research of the newest group at the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience.
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