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Beating high altitude sickness with beet juice

The human body isn’t made to operate at high altitude, but drinking beet juice may help the body acclimatize.

Precision injections of Botox into migraine "centres"

Researchers are using a high-precision instrument to inject toxins that alleviate migraine attacks. This means even better needle guidance and user-friendliness.

Professor of economics: International climate agreements are too short-sighted

The world’s environmentalists are counting down to the upcoming UN climate summit in Paris. However, such climate agreements could be counterproductive, claims Norwegian professor.

Women and men react differently to infidelity

Men are clearly more jealous of sexual infidelity than emotional infidelity. The opposite is true for women.

The mackerel is out of shape

In recent years, mackerel stocks have been thriving, both in terms of their numbers and distribution. But the individual mackerel are not doing so well. They are growing more slowly and have become thinner, probably due to tough competition for food within the population.

Children and the Internet is an ethical minefield

When children are asked about their Internet use, their responses differ to those of their parents. This is one of many ethical dilemmas for those conducting research with children. The children’s answers often challenge adults' view of children.

Better endurance with strength training

Traditionally, endurance athletes want to avoid gaining muscle mass. But a new study shows that bigger muscles are important to get a positive effect on achievement, especially for cyclists.

Depression can lead to work disability

In Norway, men suffering from depression are three times more likely to become work disabled than non-sufferers. This risk is only twice as great for women.

Robots – our new underwater astronauts

Soon it may be easier to design, plan and carry out operations in deep water.

Scientists find smallest life forms on Earth

Researchers may have found the smallest life forms on Earth. The bacteria they found are much smaller than scientists thought possible.
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