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Nobel Prize Lectures live stream

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: The Nobel lectures of laureates John O’Keefe, University College London, and Edvard and May-Britt Moser, Norwegian University of Science and Technology will be live streamed on Sunday 7 December, beginning at 13:00 CET.

Gertrude, Tarzan, and the rest of the Nobel gang

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Animal welfare is important for Nobel laureates May-Britt and Edvard Moser. Not just because that is how it should be, but also because the researchers get the best results that way.

Video: The Nobel Dance

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel laureate and NTNU Professor May-Britt Moser was full of joy when she learned she had won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with her husband, Edvard Moser, and their former mentor, John O’Keefe. See for yourself.

A village of neuroscientists

2014 NOBEL PRIZE: Nobel laureates May-Britt and Edvard Moser have spent the last two decades building a village of neuroscientists, molecular biologists, physicists and anatomists – whose different and complementary skills are key to the goal of unlocking the secrets of how the brain actually comput

Virus a possible cause of type 1 diabetes

Researchers have found a virus in the pancreas of patients with type 1 diabetes. The discovery may offer the potential for both treatment and a vaccine.

Norwegian research priorities for 2016

The Research Council of Norway is proposing an increase of NOK 1.1 billion for research in its input to the national budget for 2016. Special target areas in the proposed budget for 2016 include sustainability, innovation, the EU and world-leading research groups.

Robot water pipe inspectors

Norwegian researchers and a small company in Tromsø are taking part in a project aimed at preventing between 30 and 50 per cent of Europe’s drinking water being lost due to pipe leakages.

Power alone does not make people pursue pleasure and reward

It is only when their desires are triggered that powerful people are willing to go one step further to fulfil their dreams.

Blue mussels à la Svalbard on the menu?

Back when the Vikings ruled, blue mussels had a natural habitat in Svalbard. They disappeared when the climate cooled, but today blue mussels have re-established themselves at 78 degrees North. The Svalbard blue mussel is thus a clear and present climate indicator of a warming Arctic.

When the oil runs out, the age of tiny things begins

Norway may have to depend on nanotechnology as its main source of income in the future. Nanotechnology is all about creating custom materials on a tiny scale that allows for incredible possibilities in the real world.
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