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Seeing the difference between roads and forests

Colour blindness can make reading maps incredibly hard, with red roads passing through green forested areas. But help is on the way.

This is how your personal consumption affects the climate

You won’t make big cuts in your environmental impact by taking shorter showers or turning out the lights. The real environmental problem, a new analysis has shown, is embodied in the things you buy.

Mapping the world for climate sensitivity

By using information gathered by satellites, a group of biologists have developed a new method for measuring ecosystem sensitivity to climate variability.

Fewer heart problems in people who drink moderately but often

People who drink wine, liquor or beer regularly are less prone to heart failure and heart attacks than those who rarely or never drink. Three to five drinks a week can be good for your heart.

Seabirds are contaminated more by food than microplastics

Microplastics are not a significant source of environmental pollutants in fulmars. Seabirds ingest most of these pollutants through food.

The day Atlantic City blew away

Researchers are mapping the geology of Jan Mayen Island, Norway’s most northwesterly territory. In the process, they also found ruins from Atlantic City, an American base from the Second World War.

New sensor will make life safer for the elderly

Pressure measurements enable a newly developed fall detector to “observe” falls that current sensors do not register, thus improving safety for older people who live at home.

Physically active individuals cope better with heart attacks

People who exercise regularly tend to be less depressed after a heart attack. Those who don’t work out yet can also find reason for optimism from the research.

Technology that removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere

You may as well learn the expression “carbon-negative technology”, or Bio-CCS, right away, because it has become a talking point in technological circles.

Stressed doctors make more mistakes

Stress and errors go hand in hand in hospital emergency rooms, according to new research.
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