Latest news from our partners

Syndicate content

The basement solves an oxygen puzzle

The Earth’s atmosphere did not become rich in oxygen in a single event, but through a series of episodes spread over hundreds of millions of years.

Norwegian enough for local politics?

Persons with non-Western ethnic backgrounds must be “sufficiently Norwegian” to get nominated to a position in local politics.

The United States arms most dictatorships

China is often accused of supporting totalitarian regimes in Africa. But the United States arms far more African dictatorships than China does.

Chaotic current warms Norway

The Gulf streams warms Norway and Northern Europe. It is the chaos of the seas that does the trick. The current would deliver far less warmth if the waters flowed smoothly.

Teaching children in their mother tongue in Mozambique

Portuguese is the language of instruction in all schools in Mozambique, although most children don’t understand it when they start school. This is now about to change.

The toxin that steals sons

Environmental toxins can cause fewer male children to be born in Arctic populations.

Growing bones from seaweed

Artificial hips would not be quite so artificial, if researchers succeed in developing living bone mass.

Farmed fish don’t need to eat fish

Fish has traditionally been an important ingredient of feed in aquaculture, now new research shows how farmed rainbow trout can eat feed completely free of fishmeal, while growing fast in good health.

The Shrimp as a Climate Gauge

The deepwater shrimp could prove to be one of the most sensitive gauges of climate change.

HIV-specialists in high demand in Zambia

In a country struggling with an extreme HIV epidemic, the University of Zambia is educating neuropsychologists to deal with the huge demand for professionals.
Syndicate content

Today's selected stories

Crosswords, knitting and gardening lower the risk of Alzheimer's

Physical activity can prevent dementia in the elderly. But activities that stimulate the brain, such as reading, going to concerts or weeding the garden, also lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease regardless of how much physical activity the person does, a Swedish study says.