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From poison to palatable

Every night millions of people go to bed hungry. New genetic technology can help us feed the world by making inedible seeds more edible.

The sewer reveals yesterday's drinks

New methods have been developed for analyzing the by-products of the body's metabolizing of alcohol. Sewage can be used to reveal when and how much we drink.

World's toughest organisms live in northern seas

If you thought polar explorers were rugged outdoorsmen, then you haven’t met the small organisms that live on the seabed off Svalbard.

Old disputes on using the Nile may soon be solved

Millions of people in need of water are unable to utilize the Nile due to old obscure agreements. Research now shows that several of the treaties are no longer valid.

Less blood clot damage with extra treatment

Roughly half the people who get a serious blood clot in the leg experience lasting damage. A little-used supplementary treatment can help prevent such complications.

Dilemmas of mining

The mining industry wants to extract the valuable metals and minerals that can be found in Norwegian mountains, but what to do about the huge amount of waste?

Sound solutions for offshore power plants

Building wind turbines that withstand salty storms at sea is relatively straightforward – but doing it on a large scale while keeping costs in check is far less simple. Now new solutions are on the way.

Colder Nordic winters due to icefree Arctic Ocean?

There has been less sea ice in the Arctic Ocean the autumn of 2011 than ever recorded before. Is there a link between ice-free waters in the Arctic and colder winters in the Nordic region?

Tapping the brain orchestra

Norwegian researchers have developed a new method for detailed analyses of electrical activity in the brain.

Feed your genes

The genes have spoken: your dinner plate should be divided into three, and you should eat six times a day.
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What will our climate look like in 2050?

Knowing that we have the power to influence global climate is enormously important when trying to imagine what our climate might look like in 2050. To a large degree, it will depend on actions our leaders take now and in the immediate future.