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New study estimates the carbon footprints of 13,000 cities

Many see cities as the new front lines of the climate change fight. Identifying the mayors and city councils in cities with the biggest carbon footprints, and the most power to make big changes, could mobilize a wave of reinforcements.

What democracy looked like 200 years ago

How democratic was Norway in 1814? A new dataset allows you to explore the different dimensions of democracy from 1789 until now.

Unique Middle Age tapestry gives insight into medieval times

Norwegian churches in the Middle Ages were decorated with embroidered tapestries that told Bible stories almost like a comic series. The Høylandet tapestry is the only one of its kind that has survived the march of time.

Female leaders are catching up with their male colleagues

In Norway, two in three managers are still men. But researchers think this gender gap will close in one generation.

The future North Atlantic takes up more carbon than previously expected

Efficient carbon pathway to the deep ocean allows for a strong future uptake, new study shows.

East African farmers are positive to GMOs

Imagine the despair you would feel if your crops were destroyed. Perhaps due to drought, an aggressive plant disease or pests, or nutrient deficient soil? And back at home you have many hungry mouths to feed.

Sea salt reveals when oxygen entered Earth's atmosphere

Ancient sea salt drilled from a geologic basin in Russia provides new clues as to how Earth’s atmosphere became rich enough in oxygen to allow life to evolve.

This diaper liner can collect urine samples

A newly developed diaper liner can register substances in older patients urine, and rule out the possibility of urinary infection.

How bears adapt to hunting

Female brown bears in Sweden are now frequently caring for their offspring for an additional year.

The secrets of St. Clement’s church

A fascinating and complex history of the church has been uncovered, beginning with the original wooden church and leading to a sequence of three major rebuildings, corresponding in time with the transformation from Viking king Olaf to the royal saint St. Olaf of Norway.
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Today's selected stories

Humans have always caused plant and animal extinctions

Our warming planet is pushing some plant and animals species towards extinction. But there’s actually no such thing as untouched nature — humans have always altered their environment. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do our best to protect what’s here now.