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Cooled patients are treated differently

What is the best form of first aid for a cold, injured body? Mountain medicine researchers are now co-operating to find the answer. At present there is actually no “best practice” for treating these types of patients.

Eating only during active hours reduces risk of obesity

A new study of rats suggests that it’s not just what you eat, but when you eat it that affects weight loss or gain.

Unknown Viking settlement could be hidden beneath ancient church

In late 2016, archaeologists found what is believed to be the remains of St. Clement’s Church in Trondheim. But even more ancient secrets could be hiding beneath the ruins.

A new medical record will make life easier for doctors

"The medical record system of the future will find guidelines and provide support for decisions, remind the doctor about all the considerations she should make, and which laws and regulations apply to different cases," according to a researcher.

How to make the fish farming industry more climate friendly

A new Master's thesis shows that a renewable wind and solar energy solution can cut emissions by 50 per cent and at the same time increase profitability.

Helping refugee children to read — with a computer game

Syrian refugee children often do not learn to read in their native Arabic. But two new games are set to change that.

Air could be the world’s next battery

Storing compressed air in sealed tunnels and mines could be a way of storing energy in the future – if an EU project in which Norway is a partner is successful.

Wood burning pollutes the urban air in Norway

Around 45 per cent of the wood consumed in Oslo is burned in apartments. Thus, wood burning for residential heating, and the resulted particle emission, may have a much larger impact on air quality in Norwegian urban areas than previously thought.

Entrepreneurs must save the countryside

Norwegian and Czech scientists are collaborating to get more people to stay in the countryside. That's why they organized courses for entrepreneurship. "It's all about 'forcing' people to see new opportunities," says one of the researchers.

Diabetics who can’t detect their own low blood sugar

Some people with diabetes do not notice when their blood sugar level is getting dangerously low. NTNU researchers are trying to understand why.
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