Latest news from our partners

Syndicate content

New insight can lead to better breast cancer treatment

Researchers have now found out what happens when normal cells develop into breast cancer. This finding can lead to more individualized treatment: the right treatment in the right dosage for the right patient.

Brexit: Researchers doubt a Norwegian-style EEA solution would work for the UK

For the Norway model, with some kind of EEA-type solution to work for Britain, British politicians must be able to look beyond the traditional political divides, according to researchers.

Bacteria: The new superheroes

How ambitious researchers use computers to push bacteria beyond their limits.

A Digital Fishing Trip

Four Norwegian research projects develop artificial (marine) intelligence. Their results will change how you view a fish.

Norwegians judge feminists by their looks

A new study shows that Norwegians perceive feminist women as masculine, while they picture feminist men as feminine.

Young people use self-harm to share emotions

Damaging your body may be a way to control negative emotions. New research from UiO shows that young people also use self-harm to communicate and share difficult feelings, which they are unable to express in words.

Ibuprofen cannot replace antibiotics to treat urinary tract infections

Antibiotic resistance is a major global problem. Nevertheless, we should not stop using antibiotics to treat urinary tract infections.

Growing number of Muslim pilgrims in Europe

Pilgrimages have become more popular all over the world in recent years. New pilgrimage sites are emerging and in Europe Muslims and Christians are visiting each other’s pilgrimage sites.

More important for heart patients to be active than thin

Increased physical activity, not weight loss, gives individuals with coronary heart disease a longer lease on life, according to a new study conducted at NTNU.

Minority youth felt sidelined on the ski track

Minority youth find that activities such as cross-country skiing and forest and mountain hikes are linked to Norwegian ethnicity and whiteness, according to researchers.
Syndicate content