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Cooking fumes can create respiratory problems for chefs

Cooks live less long on average than people in most other occupational groups. Changes in their working environment could result in better health for many.

Women and men do not have different attitudes to sickness absence

The myth has been dispelled: New research shows that there are no gender differences in attitudes and norms regarding sickness absence.

Mobile health tools should be studied using new methods

By analysing how patients use mobile health technology it is possible to understand the health affects of the apps and those who they affect. Researchers believe that traditional research methods are not suitable.

The Helgeland coast in Norway: pristine and well-preserved

Nordic coastal ecosystems recently got a scientific health check. The Helgeland coast in Norway did well, according to Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA).

Twitter revealed a more positive attitude towards type 1 diabetes

Far more hearts, smiles and encouraging words were used when type 1 diabetes was in the tweet, compared to type 2. Researcher Elia Gabarron at the Norwegian Centre for E-health Research took a serious look at smileys.

Solving the mystery of Serengeti’s vanishing wild dogs

Twenty-five years ago, African wild dogs disappeared from Serengeti National Park. A firestorm of debate followed when one researcher claimed that handling by scientists was the cause. New research refutes that claim and offers another explanation.

Intelligent robots may strengthen gender norms

Machines and technology increasingly fill more and more human functions. According to researchers, society’s gender roles affect the development of robots and artificial intelligence, but technology may also shape ideas about gender.

How today's wars resemble the medieval wars in Nordic areas

Medieval wars can help us understand the new wars of our time.

More e-health can be life-changing for families and society

The growth of e-health solutions is not just changing relationships between patients and healthcare workers, but also family and gender structures. More light must be shed on the societal consequences, say social scientists.

Development may reduce heatwave impact

Global warming of 1.5 or 2°C will lead to more intense and frequent extreme heatwave events, a new study suggests. Better socio-economic development can help reduce their impact on society in low development countries.
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