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Overweight

More important for heart patients to be active than thin

Increased physical activity, not weight loss, gives individuals with coronary heart disease a longer lease on life, according to a new study conducted at NTNU.

Weight loss can protect overweight boys from developing type 2 diabetes

A new Danish study shows that boys who are overweight at seven are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes as adults, but not if they lose weight before hitting puberty.

Society scorns fat people says sociologist

We often speak of a worldwide obesity epidemic. A Swedish researcher calls it a stigmatization of fat people.

Online weigh-loss groups provide support and comfort

Online weight loss forums protect participants from public fat shaming, and offer them a place to speak out without being confronted by normal-weight individuals, medical science or the authorities.

Overweight youths at greater risk for heart failure

A high BMI when you’re young increases the risk of heart failure, even if you’re dieting away the pounds as you get older. Yo-yo dieting is the worst.

Is optimism the key to making weight loss surgery a success?

A new Norwegian study compares people who underwent bariatric surgery with those who tried to lose weight using traditional dieting and exercise. One difference was optimism in the surgery group that they would succeed.

Fat or too heavy?

The words that doctors use to discuss weight with their patients have an effect on the doctor-patient relationship. A Norwegian study gives clues as to the best and worst words to use.

Female gamers risk weight gains

Young women who play computer games an hour or more per day have a higher chance of getting fat than ones who don’t. The Swedish study oddly found no comparable results among male gamers.

Eating habits matter most when children gain weight

Some children gain weight faster than others. Eating habits seem to have far more to say than physical activity.

When science promoted sugar as healthy

Studies in the 1970s showed that people couldn’t get overweight or develop cardiovascular diseases from consumption of carbohydrates such as sugar. A Norwegian professor thinks we are still paying for this mistake.