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Medical diagnoses

Many diagnosed with asthma may actually have EILO

EILO, or Exercise-Induced Laryngeal Obstruction, is a condition where the voice box closes down during vigorous exercise. Norwegian researchers believe many people with this condition are misdiagnosed and are given the wrong treatment.

Should colon cancer screening start at age 45 or 55?

In May of this year, the American Cancer Society updated its screening guidelines for colorectal cancer, recommending that testing begin at age 45, which is five years earlier than currently is the practice. Two Norwegian doctors think this is a bad idea.

Rising number of Swedish women suffer recurrent miscarriages

A new Swedish study indicates that a rising number of women have experienced three or more miscarriages in a row. The medical researchers are uncertain as to the cause.

Diagnosing arthritis with a colour scan

An easily used screening tool shines new light on how to detect arthritic inflammations.

First image of an irritable bowel

Just a few years ago many in the medical profession thought that the common intestinal malady irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was psychological – with its origins in the head, not the gut.

Working to improve the diagnosis of prostate cancer

Severely ill prostate cancer patients are helping researchers test a diagnostic tool that involves injecting a radioactive substance into their bodies.

Lung cancer is rarely detected by current X-ray examinations

X-ray images reveal only 20 percent of the lung cancer cases. CT images reveal 90 percent.

New research may change how MS is diagnosed

What doctors believed to mark nerve cell death may instead show reparable injury in patients with multiple sclerosis.

MRIs can’t detect every prostate cancer

Every year around 5,000 Norwegian men are diagnosed with prostate cancer. A new diagnostic procedure using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is in use, but to date it is too unreliable to use on its own.

Prompt detection hastens healing of psychoses

Individuals whose serious psychoses are detected and treated within just a few weeks of being diagnosed appear to have double the chance of being in sound mental health ten years later.