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Marine research

Eagle-eyed subsea camera

A new subsea camera has been developed that can see two to three times further under water than existing cameras and calculate distances to objects. This will make work carried out under water much easier.

Here comes the electric fishing boat

The world’s first electrically powered fishing boat will be presented this August in Trondheim, Norway. But more time and development is needed before it can run completely without diesel.

Seventeen projects to generate knowledge about ecosystems

A total of NOK 240 million has been awarded to 17 projects to study the responses of ecosystems to changes in climate and the environment as well as the cumulative effects on the ecosystem.

Researchers take tourism to a higher level

When research hooks up with the travel business, tourists can expect much more meaningful experiences. This is seen in research on whale safari tourism.

Copenhagen invaded by research fleet

As part of this summer’s science festival ’Science in the City’, a fleet of research ships will be docking in Copenhagen. The public is invited on board to learn about the ins and outs of marine research.

Counting copepod crap

A mind-boggling array of tasks forms the underpinning of our understanding of the factors that affect the climate, both now and as the planet warms. Danes aboard the Norwegian research vessel G.O. Sars are adding to this knowledge by counting specks of zooplankton faeces.

Sounding out marine life

Scientists aboard the research ship G.O. Sars transmit pulses of sound into the sea to image the biomass below.

Helicopter sensor improves Arctic ice volume surveys

New technical equipment and software help measure sea ice thickness in the Arctic Ocean.

Hitchhiking with ocean currents

Marine animals living on Arctic ice seem destined for a catastrophe if all the summer ice melts. But a tiny krill can survive by hitchhiking north with ocean currents.

Waking plankton from hibernation

They are the motor of the ecosystem in the oceans of the high North. But we don’t know much about where plankton are during the sunless winters or how they waken in spring.