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Learning

Two-year-olds benefit from playing games on tablets

The use of electronic media by young children has an undeserved bad reputation, a new study suggests. Mothers are better at interacting with their two-year-olds when playing online games than when they are watching TV together or engaged in regular play.

Can your child’s phone bring them closer to nature?

Our five-year project will find out how apps and technology change children’s experiences and knowledge of the great outdoors. And we need your help!

Digital knowledge is a poor substitute for learning in the real world

Today, children spend more time learning in front of a screen than they do outdoors. But does this harm their understanding of the real world and physical mechanisms?

How beginners can learn to read music more efficiently

New research shows that literacy learning methods may help beginners to read music.

How to practice the right way

Now we know more about how to get really good at something. This is especially useful for people who are engaged in helping others to develop skills and knowledge — and for parents.

Basic research: Mistakes can lead to the biggest discoveries

Do not fear failure. It could be the first step towards the next important scientific discovery, says Peter Kjærgaard, director of the Natural History Museum of Denmark.

Three tricks to singing better with children

When children sing, they’re learning language. But the right tempo and tone of voice are important factors for them to be able to sing along.

Boosting the brain can lead to an overload

Electrical stimulation of the brain's cells whilst solving challenging tasks can lead to mental overload.

Schools to blame for unmotivated students

Motivation is created by schools and is not something that a student either has or doesn't have,shows new research.

Learning in day care - is that what we really want?

Two-year-olds are now subjected to school-like learning. But is sitting still and neglecting playtime really the best thing for our children?