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Law

The Norwegian constitution: from autocracy to democracy

When the Norwegian constitution was adopted in 1814, it represented a dramatic break from the absolute monarchy and aristocratic privilege of the past.

Too many feel muzzled at work

“The body of laws are so fuzzy that most employees simply don’t dare speak out for fear of losing their jobs,” says Jan Fridthjof Bern, a professor of law at the University of Bergen.

Police escalate use of secret surveillance

Covert police operations including mobile phone surveillance and the use of confidential informants, undercover officers and infiltrators are gaining ground. But little research has been conducted to show whether these methods really work.

Norwegian research gets its Code of ethics

It is first and foremost meant to be advisory, but failure to comply with several of the guidelines may violate other laws and regulations.

Older police officers struggle with proper arrest technique

The oldest police officers do not have the necessary skills when it comes to making physical arrests. They resort to using baton and pepper spray instead.

Climate refugees hard hit by unclear laws

Several hundred million people will have fled their homes by the end of this century due to climate change. Still, the laws affecting these refugees are unclear.

Many don’t take 40 km/h zones literally

Drivers are more likely to speed a little on stretches of road where they are supposed to drive real slow.

Courts more likely to move against racist and discriminatory speech

The threshold has been lowered for prosecuting and convicting people of hate speech in Norway, according to a Bergen legal scholar.

From voting to legal action

Lawsuits are set to gain in importance over the ballot box as internationalisation gathers pace.

Due process of law toned down in international criminal courts

It can be easier to convict political leaders if the fundamental values of criminal law are given low priority