Syndicate content

Law

Does international criminal justice still matter?

In April more than 30 people were killed by a chemical weapon attack in Syria.

Unequal access to international courts

People face great differences in their access to international courts. "The courts are facing several challenges to become more independent, open, and accessible to the people," says researcher.

Inside Guantanamo’s barbed wire fence

A Norwegian researcher on international courts and tribunals wanted to see what is going on in the Military trials at Guantanamo Bay. That turned out to be quite the challenge.

“Norwegian authorities fail Muslim women”

When Norwegian law meets Muslim family law, the human rights of Muslim immigrant women are violated. This is one of the findings in a new doctoral dissertation

Ugandan anti-gay laws have not curbed homosexuality

Uganda has proportionately as many homosexuals as other countries, despite the threat of death sentences.

Combatting abuse of elderly requires collaborative solutions

Older people are being harassed and terrorized by their own children and grandchildren. Few people know about it and when they do, they seldom intervene.

How young criminals explain their delinquent deeds

Young people’s narratives about themselves may make it easier for them to engage in crime.

Non-citizens punished by deportation

Norwegian police use deportation and punishment interchangeably to avoid spending resources on foreigners in prisons

Professor: let’s fight corruption in Africa effectively

Foreign aid in Africa often lands in the wrong pockets. This leads many to call for a stop to aid Africa’s poor. A Professor of law suggests new, more sustainable solutions to the dilemma.

The Norwegian constitution: from autocracy to democracy

When the Norwegian constitution was adopted in 1814, it represented a dramatic break from the absolute monarchy and aristocratic privilege of the past.