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Information technology

Could we predict crimes the way we predict weather?

Experts think we have enough data to be able to know where the next crime will happen before it actually does. But criminologists say that’s pure hype.

Good or bad innovation ideas?

The traditional way of running a project with a beginning and an end will soon be history. The scientists have a smarter solution.

Watch the past happen

Warships sailed in Norwegian fjords in 1940. You can now go back in time and follow them through your mobile.

Intelligent clothing for extreme weather

Norwegian laboratories are developing technical clothing that can “sense” how your body is responding. This will make working under extreme weather conditions safer.

3D artists find inspiration in a bone yard

Morphing long-abandoned whalebone piles into plastic and cardboard art

CF-sufferers get help from apps

People suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) are unable to absorb sufficient fats and proteins from the food they eat. But an app is on the way that will help them control their illness.

Using 3D printers to print out self-learning robots

When the robots of the future are set to extract minerals from other planets, they need to be both self-learning and self-repairing. Researchers at Oslo University have already succeeded in producing self-instructing robots on 3D printers.

Quantum computing: designing the internet of the future

Mathematician hopes to uncover how to communicate most efficiently in a network based on the laws of quantum mechanics.

Practicing nursing care in a virtual world

While Facebook wants to make the world’s best online games using the Oculus Rift headset, researchers are using the same set-up to help teach nurses how to communicate better.

Professor revolutionises computers with the most random function ever

Computers need to be able to generate random results in order to work. A Danish researcher has now created the most random function in the world.