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Ice Age

Melting Scandinavian glaciers made Europe cool and dry

Scientists have found an explanation for one of the big mysteries in climate science with the help of 12,000-year old Swedish midges.

Icebergs in the North Atlantic caused rain in the tropics

Ancient air bubbles trapped in Antarctic ice since the last Ice Age reveal how the climate was in the past.

Gold deposits found in Denmark

Ice Age rivers have deposited gold in gravel pits throughout Denmark, says geologist.

Ice age water found under the Baltic Sea and Kattegat

For the first time ever researchers have drilled deep into the seabed under Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. The drillings have revealed that hidden under the sea there is freshwater that could date back to the ice age.

Reindeer genes show clear influence from last Ice Age

The genes of modern reindeer help scientists understand how past climates affected the species - and give clues as to how reindeer will handle future climate change.

Answers to predict the next ice age

Precipitations lead to the growth of ice caps at the beginning of the last ice age. Researchers have now found how this precipitation was formed. The results may help predict the next ice age.

Glacier reveals 5,400-year-old Stone Age arrow

The oldest artefact ever found in a Scandinavian snowdrift glacier has researchers abuzz. “We’ve never seen 5,000-year-old objects melt out of the ice before,” says an archaeologist from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

Why Svalbard is rising

OPINION: New measurements explain why the uplift of the Svalbard islands is larger than the models predict.

Spruce and pine survived the last ice age in Norway

Spruce and pine were able to survive the last Ice Age in Norway, and thus have a much longer history here than was previously thought. These conifers are much hardier than researchers believed, and will be able to tolerate climate change more than previous research suggested.

Deciphering Svalbard’s climate history

At most times of year, you have to be prepared for very low temperatures when staying in Norway’s Arctic archipelago, Svalbard. But the weather is in fact much milder there today than it was in the 1800s.