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Health service

Fat or too heavy?

The words that doctors use to discuss weight with their patients have an effect on the doctor-patient relationship. A Norwegian study gives clues as to the best and worst words to use.

Paper strips that allow rapid diagnoses

Biosensors can be printed on paper, manufactured cheaply and provide instant analyses.

Being homosexual and disabled

What is it like to have both a disability and a sexual orientation that is not heterosexual? A new study shows that this group encounters prejudice and ignorance in the Norwegian health care system.

Midwife training promotes mother-child attachments

Women who have given birth by Caesarean section may find it difficult to relate to their newborns. Special training can give midwives the tools they need to help these mothers.

Two routes to the same result in patient safety

Scandinavian neighbours Norway and Denmark both have campaigns to bolster safety concerns in the health services. But they’ve taken different routes: the Danish just went for it, while the Norwegians made extensive preparations.

Helping kids who developed sleep disorder after controversial vaccination

Children and adolescents who developed narcolepsy following the mass vaccinations during the global outbreak of swine flu can now expect better support from Norway’s public health services.

Creating safer surgery

Surgical procedures save and improve lives worldwide, but the figures on serious complications and deaths are high. The numbers can be reduced.

The hard road off the sofa

Type 2 diabetics struggle to adjust their lifestyles and habits in keeping with medical recommendations. Patient groups could be the answer.

Large differences in ADHD treatment

Attitudes about Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and how to treat it vary enormously from country to country. Dissimilarities in the use of medicines and psychosocial countermeasures are also evident.