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Geology

Aerial photos from Greenland topple climate models

Greenland’s ice sheet is not behaving as scientists have expected, and the climate models must be revised, new research suggests.

How to build the perfect sandcastle

Scientists have come up with a formula that makes it possible to build spectacular sandcastles.

Study casts doubt on popular mass extinction theory

A new study casts doubt on a popular theory about the mass extinction that occurred in the transition between two geological periods, the Triassic and the Jurassic. The findings give us a better understanding of today’s climate changes, scientists claim.

Greenland is rising out of the sea

Melting ice is currently causing Greenland to rise by 3 cm a year. This rate is accelerating, and if the entire ice sheet is to disappear, the island would rise about one kilometre, new GPS readings reveal.

Remains of gigantic meteorite crater found in Greenland

A Danish geologist has discovered remains of what appears to be the world’s largest and oldest meteor impact crater in Greenland.

Unearthing the cause of mass extinction

The cause for mass extinction can be unearthed by looking at big volcano-like offshore structures in Norway and South-Africa.

Modern plate tectonics arose 3.2 billion years ago

Plate tectonics – geological developments that have given the Earth its current appearance, with oceans, continents, mountains and deep valleys – started 3.2 billion years ago, new research shows.

Colour secrets revealed in fossilised fish-eye

A Swedish palaeontologist and Danish researchers have now proved that prehistoric fossils still have traces of colouring from the animal’s skin, hair or feathers.

Lack of oxygen led to first mass extinction

The first mass extinction of animal life on Earth was previously blamed on a rise in the oxygen concentration in the oceans as a result of a cooler climate. But a new study shows the catastrophe was really caused by a massive decrease in oxygen.

Harmful bacteria invade the groundwater

New research reveals that bacteria in farm slurry seep down to the groundwater before they can be broken down in the subsoil.