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Geology

Huge eruption adds new perspective to past climate

Scientists have found matching traces of a giant prehistoric volcanic eruption in ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. The discovery sharpens our understanding of past climate.

Man has affected the climate for 2,000 years

New research using ice cores from Greenland shows that mankind emitted greenhouse gases affecting the climate during the time of the Roman Empire.

Getting Arctic raw materials requires a gentle hand

We must be very careful if we want to preserve the Arctic region’s special natural environment and culture while ensuring that the coming raw materials boom doesn’t turn into a disaster.

Glacial youth therapy for the Scandinavian landscape

The high elevation flat surfaces characteristic of the Norwegian landscape are in geologically terms young.

Mountains are younger than we think

A new study has shaved several million years off the age of mountain ranges following new evaluations of fossils and other impressions of ancient sea animals and plants.

Thawing permafrost emits more carbon than expected

Thawed Arctic permafrost emits more greenhouse gases to the atmosphere than scientists have thought. This can have frightening consequences, warns a researcher.

Oilfields have reduced their methane emissions

Capturing methane-rich natural gas from oilfields has helped ensure that emissions of methane have been far lower than expected, a new study shows.

An entire army sacrificed in a bog

Archaeologists have found skeletal remains of an entire army in an ancient mass grave in Denmark. The bones confirm reports from written sources of shocking Teutonic massacres.

Hydrogen sulphide and lack of oxygen stifled early life

After the Triassic geological period gave way to the Jurassic, life was almost impossible on the seabed in coastal waters. The water here lacked oxygen but was rich in toxic hydrogen sulphide.

Research gives clean drinking water for millions of Vietnamese

Geological studies carried out by Danish researchers are giving hope to the millions of people in Southeast Asia who drink groundwater contaminated by arsenic – a highly poisonous substance.