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ForskerZonen

Articles written by researchers from universities and research institutions in the Nordics.

ForskerZonen (meaning Researcher Zone in Danish) is part of our Danish sister site Videnskab.dk.

Here, scientists write their own articles about their research or a topic within their field.

In doing so, they bring their expertise and knowledge out from the lab and into the open, where they can inform and help shape the public debate.

If you are a scientist based in the Nordic countries and would like to write for us, you can contact us here.

Climate change boosts algae growth in the Arctic

Microscopic algae living underneath sea ice are an essential source of food in the Arctic ocean. But do we really know how little light they need to survive?

Genetic test identifies “high risk” lymphatic cancer patients

Patients with mantle cell lymphoma are more likely to relapse if they carry mutations in the cancer gene, TP53. The results could help provide more targeted treatments for this “high risk” group.

Gravity: it is all in your head

We take it for granted that gravity pulls things towards the Earth. But in reality this is just one of many explanations. And they are all equally made up.

Bird senses can improve drone navigation

South American oilbirds combine echolocation and extremely sensitive vision to find their way through dark caves. Decoding how they do this could help develop autonomous drones.

Red, white, and hot telephones: on hotlines and international diplomacy

The US and the Soviet Union had one. North and South Korea have just reopened theirs. Here’s a look at how hotlines have been used in modern diplomacy.

Is all soil more acidic than we thought?

Our research suggests that it is and that we’ve been measuring soil acidity wrong for years. This could have big implications for our understanding of many fundamental biological processes.

How do scientists find new planets?

Technological advances have allowed scientists to find thousands of exoplanets during the past few decades. But even better methods are on the way, and perhaps we will find life on other planets within the next 20 years.

Can your child’s phone bring them closer to nature?

Our five-year project will find out how apps and technology change children’s experiences and knowledge of the great outdoors. And we need your help!

Digital knowledge is a poor substitute for learning in the real world

Today, children spend more time learning in front of a screen than they do outdoors. But does this harm their understanding of the real world and physical mechanisms?

Can large objects exist in a quantum state?

Quantum physics is the study of objects at the tiniest atomic level, but new research will investigate whether quantum technology can be used on a large scale.