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Food & Nutrition

How much more environmentally friendly is it to eat insects?

Insect farms emit 75 per cent less carbon and use half as much water as poultry farms, shows new study.

Is it dangerous to eat food grown right by the road?

A reader wonders how pollution affects the food crops that grow along Norwegian roads.

Cod may be healthier than salmon for overweight men

When researchers looked at the diets of northern Norwegian men over a 13-year period, they found that lean fish was good for both cholesterol and blood pressure levels. But not everyone is sure this is true.

Pregnant women who eat fewer eggs and meat can have kids with late brain development

Norwegian researchers have found that five-year-olds who received little vitamin B12 as infants tend to have greater problems solving various language and numerical problems as well as understanding other children's emotions.

Milk-lovers should compensate with lots of fruit and vegetables

Many who drink a lot of milk on a daily basis lead shorter lives than those who don’t. Eating large amounts of fruit and vegetables can have a protective effect, according to a new study.

Eight a day is clearly best for your heart

You’ve heard it a thousand times, that little catchphrase with the magic number encouraging you to eat “five a day” of fruits and vegetables for better health. But it turns out that the real magic number is eight, according to a new comprehensive study,

Why Norwegian soldiers didn't approve of 'Meat free Monday'

In an effort to be environmentally responsible and to eat healthier, the Norwegian army decided to introduce a meat free day every week. But the soldiers were not impressed.

Too little food from animal sources may increase risk of preterm birth

Pregnant women increase their chances of vitamin B12 deficiency if they don’t consume enough meat, milk or eggs. This vitamin is found only in animal products. A deficiency of the vitamin during pregnancy could have dramatic consequences for the foetus.

Nut consumers live longer lives

People who eat a handful of nuts every day have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer, and they are less likely to die from respiratory diseases, diabetes and infections, according to a new study.

Very-high-fat diet reversed obesity and disease risk

New study challenges the long-held idea that saturated fats are unhealthy.