Syndicate content

Evolution

Scandinavians are the earliest Europeans

Scientists have sequenced a 37,000-year-old genome. The results show that present-day Scandinavians are the closest living relatives to the first people in Europe.

Prehistoric humans were far smarter than previously assumed

325,000-year-old stone tools go to prove that our forefathers were far better at collaborating and planning than we thought.

Darwin treasure found in Denmark

A handwritten document by Charles Darwin has been discovered at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. The document led researchers to another Darwin artifact hidden in Denmark.

Honeybees appear to be Asian

The first global genetic analysis of honeybees reveals new insights into their history.

Missing link found on sharks

On any visit to a rocky seashore, you are likely to spot barnacles, unoffendingly stuck to hard surfaces. But barnacles in a fjord in Norway have become parasites that eat fish through feeding stems.

How important is the nose?

New experiments show how important the human nose is to our appearance.

Sperm cells compete in a never-ending race

Promiscuous bird species have less variation in their sperm cells. The explanation is the fierce competition that occurs between sperm cells when more than one male mates with the same female.

Why does poor mimicry work?

Hoverflies mimic the appearance of wasps to avoid being eaten. But even to our untrained eyes they seem to be doing a shoddy job. So why does it work anyway?

Swedish ferns stuck to their Jurassic game plan

A remarkable finding from Skåne County in the south of Sweden shows that the royal fern has not changed genetically in the past 180 million years.

Heather burning has affected evolution

Heather seeds germinate faster after a fire.Though only in cultural landscapes.