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ESOF2014

Denmark aims to be rid of fossil fuels by 2050

The Earth's fossil fuels are running out and the planet is heavily burdened by CO2 emission. The Danish government has addressed this by setting an ambitious goal to end dependency on fossil fuels.

Making fat people slim with modified DNA

Genetically designed cells, which release hormones telling the humane body that it is full, could be a solution to worldwide obesity.

Danish scientists can soon predict which diseases you’ll get

Data from more than six million Danish patients has allowed scientists to map out how illnesses develop. In the future they will be able to predict which diseases will affect you.

Is independent science journalism doomed?

A debate during the Science in the City festival addressed a question that concerns science journalists around the world: does independent science media have a future?

Science communication: 'you're allowed to spice things up'

How do you make the abstract world of mathematics fascinating to a broad audience? A Q&A with award-winning mathematician Cédric Villani.

Cities will die if cars dominate

Cities continue to be planned with little comprehension or care for what makes them vibrant and attractive, says a renowned Danish architect.

Nobel laureate: science is moving in a dangerous direction

Science has taken a wrong turn and forgets to prioritise basic research, says Nobel laureate and quantum physicist Serge Haroche.

Nobel prize winner: Let’s find dark matter and dark energy

Dark matter and dark energy continue to be cosmological conundra for physicists worldwide. Nobel prize winner Brian Schmidt offers his perspective in an interview.

Looking back on ESOF2014

This year’s European research conference ESOF is drawing to a close. ScienceNordic.com asked three of the most prominent figures what they got out of the conference.

Geoengineers can only give us a breather

Cloud brightening and other mega-scale projects to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching our planet are risky, scientists say.