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ecosystem

Sea urchin grazing of kelp may worsen negative effects of oil spill in the Arctic

Heavy sea urchin grazing of kelp forests along the coast of Northern Norway has worried fishermen, researchers and others for decades.

The Helgeland coast in Norway: pristine and well-preserved

Nordic coastal ecosystems recently got a scientific health check. The Helgeland coast in Norway did well, according to Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA).

Quest to solve global water plant mystery

Mass development of water plants in river and lakes causes headache for researchers and water managers all over the world. New research aims to reveal the causes of the explosive development and identify ecosystem effects of removing the water plants.

There are now 3.04 trillion trees on earth

Scientists have calculated the total number of trees of earth: 422 for each person. And we have lost almost the same number since the dawn of human civilisation.

Ecosystem clash imminent as Arctic warming continues

Species from the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans will soon start to mix and this could have serious consequences.

Seventeen projects to generate knowledge about ecosystems

A total of NOK 240 million has been awarded to 17 projects to study the responses of ecosystems to changes in climate and the environment as well as the cumulative effects on the ecosystem.

Sea creatures are threatened by our medicines

Medication ingested by humans is taken up by algae and sea creatures. Entire ecosystems can be affected, according to a Swedish researcher.

Norway’s first Red List for Ecosystems

For the first time an overall risk assessment for ecosystems has been done in Norway, using a method similar to the Red List criteria for species.

Hunting mysterious environmental toxins

PFAS is a group of environmental toxins which have been observed in almost every organism and every ecosystem in the entire world, including humans. But nobody really understands how they enter the body.

Tourists bring alien seeds

Tourists can unwittingly bring alien plant species to Svalbard. Increased travel activity and expected temperature increases might alter the island's ecosystem.