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The Earth

Tracking the Earth’s magnetic field in Northern Lights

Physicists are keen on solving the mysteries of the Earth’s magnetic field. Their curiosity has a practical side – when solar storms that create the aurora are bent by the magnetic field, it can affect technologies that modern civilization depends on.

Finding the roots of earthquakes

By using old records kept by the ancient Romans and medieval Italian monks, a team of geologists have brought to light the roots of earthquake-prone faults.

Less ice in Greenland 3,000 years ago than today

A new method for dating ancient sea shells reveals that the Greenland Ice Sheet was smaller between 3,000 and 5,000 years ago than it is today. The new study also indicates that the inland ice is more robust than previously thought.

Oxygenated Earth much older than we thought

The discovery of the world’s oldest soil suggests that Earth’s atmosphere contained oxygen as early as three billion years ago. That’s 700 million years earlier than previously thought.

How algae slime impacts the climate

Algae in the sea ice around the Arctic and the Antarctic convert CO2 into micro-gels. This makes it possible to see whether this cold slime actually counteracts climate change.

Greenland icebergs may have triggered the Younger Dryas

Just as the last Ice Age was drawing to a close, Greenland icebergs changed the temperature in the Atlantic and triggered a 1,000-year-long extension of the Ice Age.

First known Uranian Trojan companion found

A Danish astronomer and his colleagues have discovered a little space rock that circles the sun in the same orbit as Uranus. This is the first time that astronomers observe a so-called ‘Trojan’ asteroid companion for Uranus.

Early Earth was pounded into pieces

Scientists have found evidence of a previously unknown meteor bombardment of Earth some 4.3 to 4.1 billion years ago.

Enduring climate crisis by gene doubling

Ancient grains of pollen show how conifers survived one of the Earth’s greatest mass extinctions.

Proof: Our climate has become more extreme

The climate has not only become warmer – it has also become more extreme, new research shows.