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Diabetes

Diabetics could live eight years longer with special treatments

There is light on the horizon for some type 2 diabetic patients, shows new research. Patients lived significantly longer when following an intensive form of treatment that tackles a broad range of symptoms.

15 weeks of high-intensity swimming can help prevent diabetes

Short bursts of high-intensity swimming prevents type 2 diabetes in middle-aged women, shows new research.

Exercise mends impaired diabetic heart function

Our heart’s left ventricle empties on each heartbeat. In many people with diabetes, it takes longer for the heart to refill with blood between heartbeats than in healthy individuals. But exercise can fix the problem, a new study shows.

VIDEO: Hormone may offer new approach to diabetes

Researchers have uncovered the role of a key hormone that might allow the development of new treatments for the disease.

An artificial pancreas is in the works

People with type 1 diabetes rely on insulin injections or pumps to survive. Norwegian researchers are racing to create an artificial pancreas that would revolutionize the way this disease is treated.

Scientists find gene switch for “bad” fat

New study shows that targeting a certain gene can lower fat levels in the blood and reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease.

Ninety per cent of gastric bypass patients suffer side effects

Many patients end up back at the doctor’s office with abdominal pain and other symptoms after gastric bypass surgery. But health researchers still recommend the procedure.

One in three mentally ill patients with diabetes can be saved

Individualised treatment plans for patients suffering from both type-2 diabetes and mental illness could reduce their mortality by 33 per cent.

Infants who grow fast are more prone to becoming diabetics

But scientists have yet to find out why.

Can high blood sugar lead to dementia?

A Swedish study indicates that type 2 diabetics who fail to control their blood sugar levels properly run a higher risk of developing dementia. A Norwegian scientist thinks the Swedes might be jumping the gun.