Articles by Rannveig Svendby

  • Fewer men become dads

    How is it possible to be both a present parent and a successful employee? This question has been posed by Norwegian women since the 1970s. Today, men are asking the same question.
  • Being homosexual and disabled

    What is it like to have both a disability and a sexual orientation that is not heterosexual? A new study shows that this group encounters prejudice and ignorance in the Norwegian health care system.
  • Norwegian equality policy has failed

    After several decades of equality policy, men still earn the most, dominate the media and wield the most power in politics.
  • Weekend mums meet prejudice

    Embarrassing silence, bad looks and open confrontation – these are some of the reactions faced by Norwegian women who do not live with their children after a break-up.
  • Antidote to anti-feminism

    According to Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik’s manifesto, the second wave of feminism that began in the 1970s has been a “protest against nothing” because there is no longer any real oppression of women. Senior Researcher Cathrine Holst refutes his claim.
  • Invisible child soldiers

    In DR Congo, 30 to 40 percent of the child soldiers are girls. They experience more sexual abuse and stigmatisation and they receive less help and attention from the international community.
  • Women conquer private business

    The Norwegian gender quota law for boards of public limited companies caused both excitement and indignation. Now it is being copied in many European countries.
  • Beaten by their wives

    Violence is neither a women’s problem nor a men’s problem, it is a human problem. But men who are physically abused by their partners don't talk about it.

Rannveig Svendby

Rannveig Svendby is a lecturer, freelance journalist, and a painter. She sometimes writes for Forskning.no.

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Today's selected stories

Norwegian elite support immigration

The social elite in Norway are more supportive of immigration than the rest of the country’s population. The elite are also very supportive of the welfare state, but not everyone with lots of money is thrilled with the redistribution of wealth.