Blog posts by The climate profiteers of the insect world

The scarce umber – butterfly leapfrogging northwards

By Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, and Arne C. Nilssen, UiT The Arctic University of Norway The scarce umber has traditionally been a southern species in Scandinavia, but has recently had a dramatic northward ... Read more

Cone insects – new threats to our future forests?

By Paal Krokene and Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute Insects exploit almost all possible food sources in the forest – including the trees’ flowers, cones and seeds. Insects that feed on spruce cones and seeds have not ... Read more

The common pine sawfly – a troublesome relative

By Paal Krokene, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute The red pine sawfly is well known for its widespread outbreaks in Norway’s pine forests. The common pine sawfly is, despite its name, a less common species in Norway today, but may become more ... Read more

The pine sawyer beetle – the deadly messenger

By Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute The pine sawyer (Monochamus sutor) is a moderately large (2 cm long) longhorn beetle with impressive antennae. It lives on both Scots pine and Norway spruce throughout most of Norway. The larvae ... Read more

Hungry moths moving north

By Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute The autumnal moth, the most damaging insect pest on birch in Scandinavia, is moving northwards. The last 15-20 years the moth’s outbreak area appears to have expanded into the coldest ... Read more

Bird-cherry ermine: Ghost trees on the march

By Paal Krokene, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute The bird-cherry ermine is a leaf-eating butterfly which has become increasingly prevalent over the last decade. While mass attacks previously were confined to Eastern Norway, recent years has seen this ... Read more

Bark beetle outbreaks – From bad to worse

By Paal Krokene and Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute  The spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus) has caused significant losses for forestry throughout northern Europe. Research carried out at the Norwegian Forest and ... Read more

The nun moth: Nuns heading north?

By Paal Krokene, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute Many insects are going to extend their range northwards if the climate grows warmer. This may result in the introduction of new and destructive species to Norwegian forests. One of the species we have ... Read more

The pine tree lappet – a greedy needle feeder

By Bjørn Økland, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute The pine tree lappet has had serious outbreaks in Norway in the past but may cause more frequent damage in a changed climate. Long periods of drought may trigger outbreaks of this ... Read more

The climate profiteers of the insect world – introduction

By Paal Krokene, Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute Insects are among the organisms that will react most rapidly to climate change. They have a short generation span, they are very mobile, and their rate of development is directly impacted by temperature. ... Read more

The climate profiteers of the insect world

Global climate change will probably have large negative impacts overall, but for some species a changing climate may present new opportunities. Many forest insects are likely to benefit from climate change because higher temperatures will accelerate their development from egg to adult, and because their host trees will face increasing drought and temperature stress. In this series we present a handful of forest insects that are expected to become more damaging in a future warmer climate.

The authors of the blog posts are researchers at Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute.

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