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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Modern industrialisation killed ocean cooling

Ocean temperatures were cooling for almost two millennia but then human industrialisation came along.

Tundra shrubs can speed warming

A rapidly warming climate is boosting the growth of shrubs on the tundra. These absorb more solar heat and intensify global warming.

Heavy summer rain in Greenland speeds up ice melt

Rapid ice melt in Greenland is driven by intense late summer rainfall, making the vast ice sheet even more vulnerable as the earth warms, new research shows.

Declining winter sea ice near Greenland spells cooler climate for Europe

OPINION: Loss of winter sea ice around Greenland and Iceland is affecting ocean circulation there, and could lead to a cooler climate for western Europe.

Why dinosaurs avoided the equator for 30 million years

Researchers have discovered why it took the dinosaurs 30 million years to capture the equator.

The Arctic is getting wetter

In the last few winters, the airport in Longyearbyen in Svalbard was often closed because of rain. One of the major issues climate researchers deal with is how precipitation changes as the temperatures are rising all over the Arctic.

What does the average Norwegian think about climate-related issues?

Using a new method, researchers discovered that so-called climate sceptics are more ambivalent about climate issues than previously assumed.

Is the UN too slow to tackle climate change?

Most government and NGO negotiators want UN-led initiatives to tackle climate change, but support for smaller initiatives is growing.

Icebergs in the North Atlantic caused rain in the tropics

Ancient air bubbles trapped in Antarctic ice since the last Ice Age reveal how the climate was in the past.

International conference brings climate change to Greenland

Climate scientists come together with citizens, industry representatives, and politicians in Greenland to discuss climate change in the Arctic.