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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Arctic plants help cool the planet

GREENLAND: Global warming is making Arctic plants release compounds that might help cool the planet. But don’t expect it to outpace global warming.

Climate models underestimate rapid ice melt events on Greenland

Severe ice melt events on Greenland go almost undetected by climate models, which could mean that ice melt projections for the future are too low, warn scientists.

Deceleration of the Greenland ice sheet caused by 11,000-year-old events

Events that happened 11,000 years ago are still affecting the behaviour of the Greenland ice sheet today, causing it to decelerate.

How climate change changed the face of marine science

The amount of marine science papers on climate change has doubled every five years since the release of the first UN report on climate change in 1990.

Calling all armchair scientists: ESA releases Greenland satellite data

The European Space Agency launches website with access to satellite data, images, and animations of the Greenland ice sheet.

Ocean acidification might not spell doom for shellfish

New study claims that ocean acidification may not have such alarming effects on calcified marine animals as many scientists have predicted.

Top four ocean threats according to marine scientists

Overfishing, global warming, waste and contamination, and ocean acidification are at the forefront of scientists concerns.

Melting Scandinavian glaciers made Europe cool and dry

Scientists have found an explanation for one of the big mysteries in climate science with the help of 12,000-year old Swedish midges.

COP21: Still far away from a two degree global warming limit

The world holds its breath as 150 world leaders attempt to negotiate a deal to limit global warming. What have they agreed on so far?

Sweden thinks it can save the world in Paris – can it?

OPINION: Sweden believes its domestic policies are breaking the link between carbon emissions and economic growth. But can it persuade the rest of the world to adopt similar policies?