Syndicate content

Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Elephant seals help scientists study climate change

Data collected by elephant seals reveal key chemical changes in the sea around Antarctica that drive ocean circulation and climate.

Human-induced global warming began 180 years ago

An international team of scientists have detected a warming signal in some parts of the globe from as early as the 1830s.

Pumping CO2 into volcanic rock transforms it into limestone in record time

The greenhouse gas was pumped into basalt rock and turned into limestone in just two years.

Arctic sea ice at a record low

Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is at a record low for this time of year, as monthly temperature records continue to soar around the world.

Caves will reveal Greenland climate from before the ice sheet

GREENLAND: A team of scientists has explored some of the most remote caves on Earth to uncover Greenland’s climate before the ice sheet formed. Preliminary results are exciting, say scientists.

The Great Barrier Reef is in trouble

Nearly half of Australia’s famed coral reef is sending serious distress signals as persistent high ocean temperatures cause corals to bleach.

Scientist: No evidence of extreme drought and floods in the twentieth century

Climate records show no evidence of increasing extremes in wet-dry climate in the twentieth century that is projected by current climate models, shows new study.

Arctic plants help cool the planet

GREENLAND: Global warming is making Arctic plants release compounds that might help cool the planet. But don’t expect it to outpace global warming.

Climate models underestimate rapid ice melt events on Greenland

Severe ice melt events on Greenland go almost undetected by climate models, which could mean that ice melt projections for the future are too low, warn scientists.

Deceleration of the Greenland ice sheet caused by 11,000-year-old events

Events that happened 11,000 years ago are still affecting the behaviour of the Greenland ice sheet today, causing it to decelerate.