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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Climate change research was born in the Cold War

The basic environmental research that underpins our understanding of the Earth’s climate today has a long history, in part shaped through war and a race to control the North.

Is a vital pattern of ocean circulation about to shut down?

A new study indicates that current climate models overestimate the stability of a vital ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. A breakdown could mean a “chaotic” climate in the Nordics, say scientists.

Greenland seaweed helps combat ocean acidification

Kelp forests around Greenland take up enough CO2 to locally offset ocean acidification and protect local shellfish, shows new research.

Four years later: is CO2 making us fat?

In 2012 a group of scientists proposed a hypothesis that CO2 in the atmosphere is making us fat. We’ve checked in with the scientists to see what developments they’ve made.

Arctic soils: a ticking climate time bomb

Carbon emissions from Arctic soils threaten to greatly accelerate climate change by 2050.

"Climate change needs to be adressed locally, not globally"

The historic UN climate agreement has entered into force. But a Norwegian Professor has little confidence in the agreement.

“Irreversible” glacier retreat in West Antarctica began 70 years ago

The retreat of the Pine Island Glacier on the West Antarctic ice shelf began in the 1940s, kick-started by the arrival of warm water from the Pacific Ocean.

Animal teeth record how species live and die

New technique uses animals’ teeth to see how their environment changed throughout their lives.

Time is running out to adapt to dramatic sea level rise

Eighty per cent of world’s coastal areas could experience more than 1.8 metres of sea level rise by 2100 if global warming exceeds two degrees Celsius by the middle of this century.

Arctic sea ice is approaching the limit of natural variability

Around 8,000 years ago, Arctic sea ice was lower than it is today--but rapid decline in the last 40 years means it is fast approaching this natural limit.