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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Scientists: Europe is committed to Earth monitoring programs, even if the USA is not

Possible cuts to US climate and satellite programs have scientists on both sides of the Atlantic concerned. Europe is already talking a lead in the face of US uncertainty, but they should not be complacent, say scientists.

When will the large crack on this Antarctic ice shelf break away?

Scientists are closely monitoring a large crack spreading on the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica. Follow our interactive guide to see how the crack has developed.

NASA project reveals vulnerability of Greenland glaciers

A project to map Greenland’s coastal glaciers and fjords is under way and the initial results are in. New maps depict Greenland’s coast at an unprecedented level of detail.

Nordic project will solve a riddle of dramatic climate change

Scientists in Denmark and Norway seek to reveal what caused rapid climate change events first discovered in the early Greenland ice cores.

Sea level rise: How far and how fast?

OPINION: A recent study of ocean temperature 125,000 years ago sparked headlines that up to nine metres sea level rise was on the horizon. But could this really happen? And if so, how quickly?

Scientists solve old mysteries of bird migration routes

A new study has mapped the migration routes of nightingales, cuckoos, and shrikes. It is a quantum leap in our understanding of bird migration, says scientist.

Climate change research was born in the Cold War

The basic environmental research that underpins our understanding of the Earth’s climate today has a long history, in part shaped through war and a race to control the North.

Is a vital pattern of ocean circulation about to shut down?

A new study indicates that current climate models overestimate the stability of a vital ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. A breakdown could mean a “chaotic” climate in the Nordics, say scientists.

Greenland seaweed helps combat ocean acidification

Kelp forests around Greenland take up enough CO2 to locally offset ocean acidification and protect local shellfish, shows new research.

Four years later: is CO2 making us fat?

In 2012 a group of scientists proposed a hypothesis that CO2 in the atmosphere is making us fat. We’ve checked in with the scientists to see what developments they’ve made.