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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

It's important to have a goal: UN climate report view from the Nordics

Most experts agree it will be difficult, if not impossible, to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. But it is important to have an ambitious goal.

How kite skiing and weighing snow helps improve projections of sea level rise

For the past two years, scientists from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland have skied across the Greenland ice sheet to see how much snow is accumulating. Their data will ultimately improve projections of sea level rise.

How Nordic marine forests can help fight climate change

Despite the wealth of marine forests throughout the Nordics, we are yet to exploit their potential role in combating climate change. Here’s what we need to do.

Marine forests - Nature's own carbon capture and storage

Kelp forests and seagrass meadows soak up carbon dioxide and help protect our coasts against rising seas. Just two reasons why we should learn to love our marine forests.

Could rising land slow down Antarctic ice melt?

The West Antarctic ice sheet is sitting under water. This is key to understanding the evolution of the ice sheet and how the rising sea floor might even help to slow down ice melt in this part of Antarctica.

How fast can Antarctica rise when the ice melts?

New study shows that the land underneath a part of West Antarctica is rising five times faster than expected as the ice melts, revealing a surprisingly soft Earth structure beneath the ice sheet.

Time to re-think the climate change challenge

OPINION: We now know enough about the nature of the earth system that the risk of crossing a planetary threshold that propels us into a Hothouse Earth needs to be taken very seriously.

Loss of marine habitats is threatening the global fishing industry – new research

New study reveals the first quantitative global evidence for the significant roles that seagrasses play in supporting fishery productivity.

Why you can't have free trade and save the planet

OPINION: For centuries world trade has increased not only environmental degradation, but also global inequality. The expanding ecological footprints of affluent people are unjust as well as unsustainable.

Power to the people - How to make the low-carbon energy transition work

A recent study of two successful energy transitions in Denmark and Germany shows that transparency and community participation are essential to drive the clean energy agenda forward at the local level.