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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Danish "lakes" provide unique insights to climate change

Lakes release a greenhouse gas, methane, but exactly how much has been somewhat of a mystery. New research has some answers.

Greenland’s recent temperature drop does not disprove global warming

Unfortunately, the planet is still getting warmer.

More geo-engineering, please!

Geo-engineering could help us solve the problem of global climate change, but only if we do it in a sustainable way and tackle the problem at the source.

The mind-bending physics of Scandinavian sea-level change

The Greenland ice sheet is a poster child of climate change. But in the Nordics, what happens in West Antarctica and Alaska has a more profound impact on local sea level rise. Sounds strange? Here’s how it works.

The machine that converts carbon dioxide to stone in Iceland

The new technology could help mitigate climate change, says scientist.

How China reduced Europe’s carbon footprint

Recent policy changes in China probably have a much bigger effect on EU and U.S. carbon footprints than any other factor.

Scientists prepare for loss of mountain glaciers

This is how we adapt to a future with less snow and ice.

Climate models have not “over-predicted” warming

A new study suggests that the Paris climate goal may not yet be a physical impossibility. Even if true, this does not mean that climate models are wrong, as some media outlets reported.

Mud from the Greenlandic seabed reveals a hidden past

Sea ice and bedrock shape key for glacier stability.

How the Greenland ice sheet fared in 2017

Scientists from the Danish Meteorological Institute and Polar Portal give the Greenland ice sheet its annual health report.