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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Time to re-think the climate change challenge

OPINION: We now know enough about the nature of the earth system that the risk of crossing a planetary threshold that propels us into a Hothouse Earth needs to be taken very seriously.

Power to the people - How to make the low-carbon energy transition work

A recent study of two successful energy transitions in Denmark and Germany shows that transparency and community participation are essential to drive the clean energy agenda forward at the local level.

Grasping the nettle: Swedish tax to tackle aviation’s impact on climate

OPINION: The new aviation tax aims to change consumer behavior by taxing one of the fastest growing sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the world.

Concern for global warming is not a new craze

It is 80 years since the first calculations showed that the Earth was warming due to rising greenhouse gas emissions.

Will climate change affect Norwegian kelp forests in a positive way?

Climate change, including acidification of the oceans, will likely affect many of the plants and animals in our sea and oceans. Fresh research results indicate that kelp could be favoured by some of the changes.

Climate Change draws invasive species to the Arctic

Warmer temperatures and declining sea ice pulls foreign animals and plants to the Arctic, with drastic consequences for these sensitive ecosystems.

Climate change boosts algae growth in the Arctic

Microscopic algae living underneath sea ice are an essential source of food in the Arctic ocean. But do we really know how little light they need to survive?

Danish "lakes" provide unique insights to climate change

Lakes release a greenhouse gas, methane, but exactly how much has been somewhat of a mystery. New research has some answers.

Greenland’s recent temperature drop does not disprove global warming

Unfortunately, the planet is still getting warmer.

More geo-engineering, please!

Geo-engineering could help us solve the problem of global climate change, but only if we do it in a sustainable way and tackle the problem at the source.

Humans have always caused plant and animal extinctions

Our warming planet is pushing some plant and animals species towards extinction. But there’s actually no such thing as untouched nature — humans have always altered their environment. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do our best to protect what’s here now.