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Climate Change

It's real. It's us. It's serious. So what now?

The Earth is getting warmer, and scientists are shouting from the rooftops to tell us that time is running out to prevent the worst effects this century. But behind the headlines, how much of the science do you really know and understand?

Do you really know about all of the mechanisms that make the climate change? Or why the overwhelming majority of climate scientists around the world agree that our greenhouse gases are changing the climate today?

What challenges does industry face here and now? What might our world look like in 2050 when we wake up and draw the curtains in the morning?

Realistically, what are our chances of achieving the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below two degrees? And what happens if we do not?

In this series, ScienceNordic and our partners at ForskerZonen—meaning "Researcher Zone" in Danish, part of our Danish sister site, Videnskab.dk—attempt to answer these questions and more as part of our special theme on climate change, brought to you from scientists in the Nordic countries.

Bookmark this page to stay up to date with the theme and all of our articles on climate, here at ScienceNordic.

Gif produced by ScienceNordic, using the Earth weather projection from earth.nullschool.net

Smokeless «fire» under water

We say that there is no smoke without fire, but there can be fire without smoke. At the bottom of the streams, under water, bacteria are burning organic matter, making a considerable contribution to carbon emissions to the atmosphere.

Exhaust gas is to blame: Ground-level ozone is damaging crops

Exhaust gas emissions have doubled the amount of ground-level ozone. Vegetation is being destroyed. Food production is decreasing. Researchers now fear that the damage is greatest in the Arctic regions.

Climate change in the subarctic: warmer lakes pose a danger to cold-water fish populations

Climate change is often presented primarily as a problem for future generations. However, it is already affecting our lakes in the Nordic countries in a disturbing way.

Should we say farewell to the Arctic's unique nature?

A warmer Arctic could lead to major changes in Arctic plant communities that will influence local and perhaps even global climate.

What the world can learn from Brazilian coral reefs

Unlike Australia, coral reefs in Brazil haven’t seen any mass mortality events related to bleaching so far. Could Brazilian corals hold the key to more resilient reefs?

Norwegian trees can power our jets

As much as 20 per cent of jet fuel burned in Norway in 2030 could be biofuel made from the country’s forest residues. This alone could cut greenhouse gas emissions from Norway’s aviation sector by 17 per cent.

The Arctic: we don’t know as much about environmental change in the far north as we'd like to think

The region is warming faster than anywhere else on Earth and its polar bears and melting glaciers have become a key symbols of climate change. But the Arctic, it seems, is not as well researched as you might think.

Explore 200 years of climate change in Denmark, Greenland, and the Faeroes

DATA: Each year DMI updates their historical collection of climate data, which is available to download free. Here are some of the highlights.

Declining sea ice is making the Arctic ocean warmer

Changes in the marine environment are causing shifts in ecosystems north of Svalbard.

An open letter to Danish universities: Let us show the way towards a more ambitious climate agenda

The letter is signed by more than 650 academics from a number of research fields in Denmark. They are calling for universities to lead by example, and implement climate friendly policies in the workplace in the hope of inspiring change in other sectors.