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Robot care: cold comfort?

It's furry and cosy, with big eyes and gentle whistles - miles away from the traditional perception of steel-clad imposing robots. Meet PARO, a fake seal but a real robot, with a mission to comfort the elderly in care homes.

The tongue is the future for disabled people

Danish scientists have developed a groundbreaking product that enables paralysed people to control wheelchairs, computers and TVs with their tongue.

Magnetic fridge cuts electricity bill in half

Using magnetism to create a cooling effect requires very little energy. It’s also possible to use water instead of harmful greenhouse gases to transport heat and cold.

How vinyl got its groove back

Has digital sound in CD and PC killed the soul of music? Or are there other reasons why vinyl records are experiencing a steady increase in sales?

Computer model predicts tomorrow’s nature

Researchers have developed a computer model that can look into the future. The model’s virtual world makes it possible to explore how man-made changes in nature will impact on animal life in the future.

Space eyes on ocean traffic

Not spaceships, but ships monitored from space. Norwegian hardware on the International Space Station monitors traffic on the seven seas. A new Norwegian satellite is soon on its way to help police the oceans.

Apps for science geeks

Apps can teach us about anything from the cells in our bodies to the most distant stars in our universe. ScienceNordic has asked three researchers to name some of their favourite science apps.

Drawing heat from hell

Water near glowing magma is so hot and under such high pressure that it has ten times the energy of normal geothermal sources. Can the Icelanders make use of this heat from the underworld?

3D radar study of northern lights

The atmosphere is electric high above us. Now scientists want to see the stream of particles that make up the Aurora Borealis – in 3D.

The gentle drone

Not all un-manned aircraft are prowling military predators. Drones can also be deployed to chart ice fields and pollution, or locate people who’ve fallen overboard from ships.

A murky glass mystery

Discovered by accident, it's useful as a window coating. When the sun shines, this compound gets darker. But why? Scientists have yet to find out.

Northern biolab for rent

If you have some good bio-tech ideas but no place to test them, you might consider a travel to the far North.