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Print shops search for a survival scheme

As printed news media lose their readers, printing plants need to find alternative sources of income. Technology places strong limits on their options.

On a mission to save search engines

With the exploding amounts of data, search engines will not always work reliably in the age of Big Data. A Danish researcher has set out to find new methods of rescuing our search engines.

Mega magnet to boost brain scans

A new magnet with a magnetic field 140,000 times that of the Earth’s is currently being installed in a Danish hospital. It will be used to scan brain activity and will give scientists new insight into diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, MS and epilepsy.

New app prevents phone tapping

The need for privacy is greater than ever after Edward Snowden revealed that the US is monitoring people using sophisticated software. Danish researchers have now developed an app that makes it harder to tap smartphones.

Colonoscopies should be less painful

A new type of software that measures the doctor’s pace and caution during a colonoscopy is currently being tested in several Danish hospitals. Researchers hope this will make future colonoscopies less stressful for patients.

Implanted muscular electrodes improve prosthetic flexibility

By implanting electrodes into the muscles, scientists hope they can make it easier for amputees to control their prosthetic limbs.

DIY kit makes building robots easy

A new do-it-yourself kit makes it much easier to build robots. The kit will help researchers develop and refine human-like walking robots, say the inventors.

Hand prosthesis with a sense of touch

A new hand prosthesis enables an amputee to feel a handshake for the first time in years. A quantum leap in prosthesis research, says scientist.

A 3D-printed running shoe that regenerates itself

A running shoe that can regenerate itself overnight, and is printed in 3D to fit your foot perfectly. That is the vision of a British design project with Danish participation.

Where do we look when driving around a corner?

Using the latest eye-tracking technology and vehicle telemetry, a Finnish researcher has investigated the visual behaviour of driving a car through curves.

Wresting more power from wind turbines

Offshore floating wind farms require some highly advanced and novel controls to be both long-lasting and productive.

New atom accelerator at Aarhus University

A new, highly advanced atom accelerator has just arrived at Aarhus University, Denmark. The new technology will be used on everything from dating human bones to charting the history of the Sun.


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