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Heavier cars can make traffic more dangerous

The probability of being killed or severely injured in a traffic accident is about 40 percent lower if you drive a new car. But new cars are often more massive and pose a greater threat to other road users.

More geo-engineering, please!

Geo-engineering could help us solve the problem of global climate change, but only if we do it in a sustainable way and tackle the problem at the source.

From monstrosity to laptop: the story of the personal computer

What began as a “bizarre” fantasy has now become reality.

Net Neutrality: What the Public Gets Wrong

OPINION: Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.

Researchers get phone data to chart drug abuse in Oslo

Researchers have for the first time used anonymous data from mobile telephones together with analyses of wastewater to quantify use of illicit drugs in and around Norway’s capital.

Escape the exercise doldrums with fitness apps

Your smartphone can help you overcome negative mental and physical experiences of exercise.

The machine that converts carbon dioxide to stone in Iceland

The new technology could help mitigate climate change, says scientist.

Space travel changes gut bacteria in mice

Astronaut food, microgravity, and space radiation can change the composition of gut bacteria. Understanding how could improve radiation therapy here on Earth.

Atomic structure is key to making crack-resistant phone screens

A new material can withstand powerful impacts without breaking and could be used in glass products in the future.

Pensioners unknowingly subsidise groceries for young and wealthy

High-income families in Oslo get cheaper food at the expense of those in rural areas who are unable to use apps or unwilling to disclose their consumer habits. Apps that give discounts create new economic disparities.

Humanoid robot takes over as teacher

Studies show that robots need to look and act like people if they’re to replace teachers. Then kids are fine with having a robot teach them.

Eleven rockets set to reveal the mysteries in the Earth's atmosphere

In cooperation with NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, scientists at the University of Oslo are now set to reveal the mysteries of physics in the atmosphere by launching eleven rockets.

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