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Your computer knows what you’re thinking

Commercial companies intercept and read your emails, so they can send you adverts that exactly match your profile and wants. But this doesn’t work – it’s ineffective, says informatics expert.

Political news is hard to understand

Many viewers find news about politics a tough nut to crack. The professional pundits engaged by TV channels make it all the harder.

GTA is the great contemporary novel

Action games like 'Grand Theft Auto' and 'Call of Duty' reflect reality to such a degree that we fail to distinguish the metaphors used in the games from the reality they describe.

Politics blend with art in modern protest on old chinese platter

New and old, politics and art meet when potter Paul Scott states his protest against the arrest of Chinese artist and dissident Ai Weiwei.

Inuit drum history longer than realised

Two 4,500 year-old pieces of frozen wood found in Greenland have added a couple of thousand years to the history of the Inuit drum. But they help little in revealing the drums’ origin.

Class size does matter, but only for some

Reducing the size of a class helps hard-working girls and children from disadvantaged backgrounds, but has no effect on other student groups.

Dyslexics' main problem is phonetics

A youngster’s recognition of the sounds of letters and words is closely related to how well the child can read.

Understanding today’s rude teens

When some teenagers are being ill-mannered, violent or degrading, it’s not due to a clash with authorities. It’s because other people are without relevance in their world.

The mysterious stone Madonna of the North

Saved from mould and darkness, she’s a source of mysteries – Norway’s one and only painted stone Madonna from the Middle Ages.

Emotions in politics make us rational

Letting your emotions rule your political decisions isn’t normally a good thing. But new research shows that emotions are among the factors that turn us into rational, well-informed members of a democracy.

Protestantism has left us utterly confused

Protestant Christianity takes the blame for many people's doubts about who they are. This is the conclusion of a new dissertation, which examines the existential consequences of the Protestant tradition.

Was everything better in the past?

Were the olden days really the golden days? Is everything getting worse in society and on the planet?

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